Enter your username:
Do you want to login or register?
  • Forgot your password?

    Login / Register



    Results 1 to 8 of 8
    1. #1
      Join Date
      Dec 2020
      Posts
      10

      Thoughts on wheel size choice, please

      Car is a 70 Nova. 100% street car.

      All, I would appreciate some feedback on my proposed setup prior to ordering. I know this is a pro-touring site and everyone likes big wheels and tires, (I very much do too) but I have unique tastes as to what looks good on 3rd gen Novas. I (sadly) just dont think big wheels stylistically fit, especially for the rears. Apologies in advance to everyone whos car on this site I just crapped on!!

      So. My plan is Billet Specialties Winlites (or maybe Streetlites) in 15x10 with 4.5 bs, 295/50/15 tire on the back with a 235/245 on a 7 in wheel up front, 3.5 bs. I will be ordering a custom width 9in rear from Quick Performance and mini-tubbing as necessary.



      A question I havent nailed down yet is the front setup. Still cant decide between 15s and 17s up front. 100% street car and my thoughts are, Im looking at the brakes to make the determination for me. Im set on a 2in drop spindle setup (will go lower with springs if necessary, too) and looking at either a C5 corvette or similar kit with larger rotors- seems this drives me to the 17s. A thought I have is the smaller wheels will help in the desired low stance department.

      Also, any reason to get the 15x8s for the rears vice the 10s? I figured the wider ones would give me room to grow if I ever want wider.

      Thanks for reading, Im redoing the entire car so limiting expenses is important and this forces my planning and over-thinking everything.


    2. #2
      Join Date
      Dec 2020
      Posts
      10
      Name:  7517E598-433F-4C16-BDE2-AB5646D861F9.jpg
Views: 218
Size:  291.4 KBName:  E88DD102-F0D7-441A-B78C-D60DBE8BCF3F.jpg
Views: 214
Size:  314.9 KB

      Pics of test fitting a 295 tire- cause everyone likes pics!

    3. #3
      Join Date
      Feb 2019
      Location
      Kankakee IL
      Posts
      315
      17' is a good all around size. It will fit a lot of brake kits, tires are reasonable, and the proportion of wheel arch/tire thickness ratio/wheel diameter is good.
      Tracey

    4. #4
      Join Date
      Dec 2020
      Posts
      10
      Thanks. Any benefits in a 10 in vs 8 in wide wheel?

    5. #5
      Join Date
      Aug 2019
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      62
      Country Flag: United States
      I squeezed Baer Track4 calipers on 13 rotors inside a Year One 17 wheel, so you can still have a lot of brake inside a smaller wheel.

      8 seems a bit skinny; can you go 9 on the wheel width?

    6. #6
      Join Date
      Dec 2020
      Posts
      10
      Quote Originally Posted by TanMan View Post
      I squeezed Baer Track4 calipers on 13 rotors inside a Year One 17 wheel, so you can still have a lot of brake inside a smaller wheel.

      8 seems a bit skinny; can you go 9 on the wheel width?
      I wish; unfortunately BS only has 8 and 10 in widths. Thats the first question I asked them. I ended up ordering C5 hubs/ spindles and plan on running C5 Z06 rotors and pads.

    7. #7
      Join Date
      Oct 2004
      Posts
      2,450
      Country Flag: United States
      I would go with 10s to give more lateral stability. Plus the depth will make it look more aggressive.

      Here's a C10 with 295s on a 10" for reference.
      http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/a...1&d=1391745292
      Red Forman: "The Mustang's front end is problematic; get yourself a Firebird."

    8. #8
      Join Date
      Sep 2007
      Posts
      423
      10" wide rear wheels aren't so bad as long as the tire width stays reasonable. Don't be afraid to stretch the tires a little bit.

      IMO it's stupid when guys are sweating whether that last 10 mm of tire will clear all the sheetmetal. If you have to ask then it doesn't fit. Axles & tires move around on street cars.


      IMO 16" wheels are a very underrated size. Almost nobody runs them on old muscle cars. Meanwhile the rest of the automotive world has been using them heavily for 30 years. OEMs, European, Japanese, off-roaders, etc.