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    Results 21 to 32 of 32
    1. #21
      Join Date
      Nov 2006
      Location
      Mountain Springs, Texas
      Posts
      3,759
      Country Flag: United States
      Extra tips and nozzle. Nozzle gel comes in handy too.

      I learned the hard way to wear my Miller welding jacket when welding overhead...

      Don

      1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
      1957 Buick Estate Wagon
      1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
      1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain


    2. #22
      Join Date
      Jun 2018
      Location
      Alamo, CA USA
      Posts
      219
      Country Flag: United States
      Pulled the trigger on the Miller Multimatic 220. Buy one, cry one... right? Weldersuply.com offered it with no tax, free shipping, and a free Miller Digital Performance helmet. Was at Airgas this morning to pick up my tank as well. Now I just need to grab some protection and consumables and I'm ready to roll.

      Edit: 4-6 week lead time, so I canceled it and ordered from a local shop that would have it in by the end of the week. Apparently all Miller products are having problems getting out. All that means is I have to find a helmet as well now.
      1973 Camaro: LS427/570, T56, Speedtech ExtReme subframe/torque arm

    3. #23
      Join Date
      Feb 2019
      Location
      Kankakee IL
      Posts
      270
      Most welding gloves are just calf skin. Instead of spend $30 on name brand I just buy calf skin work gloves from a box store for $10. Can't see a difference and when they get boogered just pitch them and get another and still be ahead. If it's gonna be in a high temp area buy a pair of insulated ones. I would suggest getting a Tig Finger, they're handy.
      Don't forget a pair of welding pliers and some welding clamps. These welding magnets are handy also:

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
      Tracey

    4. #24
      Join Date
      Jun 2018
      Location
      Alamo, CA USA
      Posts
      219
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by Tsaints1115 View Post
      Most welding gloves are just calf skin. Instead of spend $30 on name brand I just buy calf skin work gloves from a box store for $10. Can't see a difference and when they get boogered just pitch them and get another and still be ahead. If it's gonna be in a high temp area buy a pair of insulated ones.
      Yeah, all of the calf skin gloves look generally the same. I grabbed a couple different ones to see what will work best for me. One was insulated. All were cheap.

      Quote Originally Posted by Tsaints1115 View Post
      I would suggest getting a Tig Finger, they're handy.
      Don't forget a pair of welding pliers and some welding clamps. These welding magnets are handy also:

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
      Thanks. I'll go grab what I'm missing. I'm going to hold off on anything TIG-specific for now until I'm ready to dip my feet into that.
      1973 Camaro: LS427/570, T56, Speedtech ExtReme subframe/torque arm

    5. #25
      Join Date
      Jun 2018
      Location
      Alamo, CA USA
      Posts
      219
      Country Flag: United States
      How do you guys feel about welding tables? Something that adds a lot of value or can any work bench due? All of my benches are wood tops, so at the very least, I need some sort of welding surface to work on. HF has a low risk option here, but I don't really know what I'm looking for.
      1973 Camaro: LS427/570, T56, Speedtech ExtReme subframe/torque arm

    6. #26
      Join Date
      Nov 2006
      Location
      Mountain Springs, Texas
      Posts
      3,759
      Country Flag: United States
      I have a couple of welding tables. One has an inch thick top. The other is from these guys. I recommend one as your first fab project:

      https://weldtables.com/

      Get yourself some clamps too.

      Don
      1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
      1957 Buick Estate Wagon
      1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
      1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

    7. #27
      Join Date
      Aug 2007
      Posts
      408
      Here's a tip. I have one large gas bottle that's on the welding cart. But since you always run out of gas on a weekend I bought a small bottle as a back up.

    8. #28
      Join Date
      Feb 2019
      Location
      Kankakee IL
      Posts
      270
      Name:  177559593_488824565778269_5848676090974672552_n.jpg
Views: 36
Size:  172.9 KB

      I'm really OCD on having enough storage so rather than buy the standard welding cart I picked up a 44" tool cart and fabbed up a tank stand on the end. It has tons of storage and with some heavy aluminum plate on the top is functions as a welding table as well.
      Tracey

    9. #29
      Join Date
      Apr 2001
      Location
      The City of Fountains
      Posts
      15,576
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by roguegeek View Post
      How do you guys feel about welding tables? Something that adds a lot of value or can any work bench due? All of my benches are wood tops, so at the very least, I need some sort of welding surface to work on. HF has a low risk option here, but I don't really know what I'm looking for.
      For starting out, the HF table will work fine. I've used mine on a lot of projects.

      As with anything, you can spend as much as you want to spend, but at the end of the day, it is amazing what can be accomplished with basic tools and motivation. I built my Cougar with a minimal assortment of tools, a trusty Dewalt small impact driver. I have the HF welding table and a Eastwood TIG 200. I am not a master welder, but with a little practice I was able to build engine mounts and weld on my aluminum radiator. After 25K miles and 5 years on the road, nothing has fallen off.

      Andrew
      1970 GTO Version 2.0
      1967 Cougar build
      GM High-Tech Performance feature
      My YouTube Channel Please Subscribe!
      Instagram @projectgattago
      Dr. EFI
      I deliver what EFI promises.
      Remote Holley EFI tuning.
      Please get in touch if I can be of service.

      "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her

    10. #30
      Join Date
      Jun 2018
      Location
      Alamo, CA USA
      Posts
      219
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by dhutton View Post
      I have a couple of welding tables. One has an inch thick top. The other is from these guys. I recommend one as your first fab project:

      https://weldtables.com/

      Get yourself some clamps too.

      Don
      Quote Originally Posted by andrewb70 View Post
      For starting out, the HF table will work fine. I've used mine on a lot of projects.

      As with anything, you can spend as much as you want to spend, but at the end of the day, it is amazing what can be accomplished with basic tools and motivation. I built my Cougar with a minimal assortment of tools, a trusty Dewalt small impact driver. I have the HF welding table and a Eastwood TIG 200. I am not a master welder, but with a little practice I was able to build engine mounts and weld on my aluminum radiator. After 25K miles and 5 years on the road, nothing has fallen off.

      Andrew
      Thanks, Don and Andrew. I think what I'm going to do is practice this weekend with a bunch of scrap I bought. When I get comfortable, I'm going to go build a basic welding table. Nothing fancy, but it seems like an easy project to get me more seat time with the rig and I ultimately end up with a tool I can use. Good luck to us all.

      Quote Originally Posted by 79 Camaro View Post
      Here's a tip. I have one large gas bottle that's on the welding cart. But since you always run out of gas on a weekend I bought a small bottle as a back up.
      It is a good tip. I just picked up a small bottle. When it's done, I'll go refill it and grab a big bottle as well.

      Quote Originally Posted by Tsaints1115 View Post
      I'm really OCD on having enough storage so rather than buy the standard welding cart I picked up a 44" tool cart and fabbed up a tank stand on the end. It has tons of storage and with some heavy aluminum plate on the top is functions as a welding table as well.
      This is something that's been on my mind a lot with these purchases. Just picked up the cart for the 220, but I'm cringing at the space it's going to take up. The footprint of all this new equipment isn't insignificant, so I might look to do exactly what you're doing. Thanks for the feedback.
      1973 Camaro: LS427/570, T56, Speedtech ExtReme subframe/torque arm

    11. #31
      Join Date
      Nov 2006
      Location
      Mountain Springs, Texas
      Posts
      3,759
      Country Flag: United States
      My first fab and welding project was my rotisserie. I still wince at the welding 15 years later but I’ve used it on roughly 15 builds without issue. That project also taught me that abrasive chop saws suck big time and got myself an Evolution saw with a metal blade.

      You have officially gone down the rabbit hole. More tool purchases are in your future...

      Don
      1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
      1957 Buick Estate Wagon
      1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
      1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

    12. #32
      Join Date
      Jun 2018
      Location
      Alamo, CA USA
      Posts
      219
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by dhutton View Post
      My first fab and welding project was my rotisserie. I still wince at the welding 15 years later but Iíve used it on roughly 15 builds without issue. That project also taught me that abrasive chop saws suck big time and got myself an Evolution saw with a metal blade.

      You have officially gone down the rabbit hole. More tool purchases are in your future...

      Don
      haha I've already been looking. I was thinking chop saw, but I've seen a lot of good techniques online getting real nice miter cuts with just an angle grinder and cutoff wheel. Gonna try that for the table.
      1973 Camaro: LS427/570, T56, Speedtech ExtReme subframe/torque arm

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