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    Results 481 to 500 of 571
    1. #481
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden

      Tank is in place!



      Lots of room for luggage. Some tools, a VISA card and a tooth brush will at least fit.


      And after alot of argumenting with myself, this is the cap I'm gonna use and it will be placed here. I think...


    2. #482
      Join Date
      Apr 2005
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      2,570
      Country Flag: United States
      In my world we call that a duffel bag storage only.

      This way you can stuff it in the area by bending it around the tank and what ever else my be in it's way. The best part is if it ends up smelling like fuel you can toss it into the wash. Unlike a suitcase which you may have to toss out in the trash.




      Quote Originally Posted by Ripper View Post
      Lots of room for luggage. Some tools, a VISA card and a tooth brush will at least fit.
      marty-mj
      GarageScene.net High Speed Welding KDHotrods RecoveryRoomInteriors WegnerAutomotive Autometer Ride-Tech

    3. #483
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden

      There was nothing wrong with the intake. It just wasn't 100%...
      The old clear coat had turned yellow during the years of use, the fuel rail was scuffed and oxidated and overall a lack of finish.


      I had the intake anodized in an attempt of making it look better. I was aware of that it probably wouldn't turn out 100%, but totally forgot that there were different materials welded to it - turned out someone also had plugged the holes in the intake channels which I wasn't aware of before.


      Decided to paint the intake with wrinkle paint instead. Never used that type of paint before, but just followed the instructions.


      Since you were supposed to add heat after painting was done, I used one of the infra red heaters in the showroom at work. It was after office hours which was good since it was kind of smelly. Didn't manage to ventilate all the fumes until the day after, but people didn't care since parts of the building was repainted during that time and no one could smell the difference between wall paint and intake paint...


      Kind of nervous during the curing process that it would wrinkle, but suddenly it appeared and within a couple of minutes the entire intake was wrinkled.


      Finished result. It will become a great dust collector, but hopefully it's possible to wash off. The dust it has collected so far has been possible to blow away using compressed air.


      Anodized the fuel rails, had the ends milled since they were chopped with a angle grinder many years ago. New O-rings for fuel rails and injectors, zinc plated AN-fittings in silver instead of gold and the tubes was scotchbrited.

      Since my kauffman heads didn't have the guides for the intake, I made my own solution for position the gaskets and preventing them from moving around.



      The fuel regulator looked kind of booring too. Rusty fasterners, oxidated aluminum etc. Had all the parts anodized (it was polished before) and zinc plated the bolts. If you look carefully, you'll see that the AN-fittings was ported too - probably won't result in a power increase but it will give peace of mind know that the flow is "optimized"



      Finished result from the back...


      ...and the front. Not sure if I have room for the spacer under the hood. Time will tell... (I'll paint it black if I use it.)

    4. #484
      Join Date
      Apr 2005
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      2,570
      Country Flag: United States
      Well you have convinced me that I am now going to do the center console and lower dash in the 70.

      Keep up the incredible work as it is very inspiring.
      marty-mj
      GarageScene.net High Speed Welding KDHotrods RecoveryRoomInteriors WegnerAutomotive Autometer Ride-Tech

    5. #485
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Location
      McKinney, TX
      Posts
      1,625
      Country Flag: United States
      Looks awesome, I wonder if a satin clear would help with clean up for the intake.
      66 Mustang "Project: Ballin on a budget"
      89 Mustang "Box Wine"

    6. #486
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden
      Some more updates.

      The thermostat didn't really have the same finishing level as the intake so I had to do something with it.
      The new heat hose is smaller diameter than the old one, so I had to change the collar anyway.



      The old collar is gone, and the new one (part from a broken wiggins fitting for the correct hose)


      Finished!



      ...Or maybe not. Waaaaay to heavy to match the rest of the project. That little piece almost weighted 1 lbs (with the stock collar)




      Now it's better! Roughly 0,4 lbs, Anodized, O-rings instead of gaskets and new base plate for the smaller rad cap.






      Next up was to replace the rack for a quicker version. I'm using an electric servo, so the steering rack was intended for manual cars - which means 4 rounds lock to lock. The Quaife rack in the picture is alot faster, I'm down to ~2.2 lock to lock with a +-30 steering angle. Further adjustments can be made by altering the attachment point on the upright.


      Since the rack is level with the lower control arm, I opened the joint to confirm where the center was (so I'm getting rid of all possibel bump steer). Turned out I was a total of 2.5mm off, so the new 2.2 rack was slightly shorter than the old temporary one.


      New Quaife rack. Shortened to the correct length and gun drilled until where the cogs are to save some weight. Had to polish it also, it was too rough out of the box.


      Had the pinion galvanized since the stock one had a small piece visible (which didn't look that good after... eh. 25 years of daily driving from an old Ford Sierra donor car). Slightly over engineered, but yes I did that...
      New SKF bearing, of course.


      Assembled and ready to be mounted to the subframe.

    7. #487
      Join Date
      Sep 2004
      Location
      DFW, Texas
      Posts
      204
      Country Flag: United States
      Love all the awesome fab-work! I can't wait to see the end results.

    8. #488
      Join Date
      Sep 2016
      Location
      LA - Lower Alabama
      Posts
      553
      Wow! Just wow!

      I'm amazed at your skills, sir!

    9. #489
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden

    10. #490
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden
      My front coil overs needed more suspension travel. I knew this when I bought them, but the price for them was too tempting eventhough they needed some upgrades with new Penske parts. Considering the cost for the spare parts from Penske (longer tubes and shafts), I could easily have bought a large amount of gold instead. But gold might not have the best carachteristics for dampening wheel movements...
      I really have to cred the support from Penske. Tech manuals etc are one thing, but they also have great e-mail support. I think we exchanged 30 e-mails before the order was shipped.


      Since the coil overs still are unused, I made a special tool for disassembly to avoid scratching them




      Once opened, everything was cleaned and taken further apart for measuring so I know what settings I have now. Planning to shim them when I have the final weight of the car and it'll be easier to start if I know what I have today.



      Screw scratches... Had to bring out my special tool #3 for removing the upper eyelets from the body since they sat with loctite.


      After new shafts and a new body, everything was put together and refilled with oil. Getting rid of all the air took forever...


      Finished result. 6" travel - 2" out, 2" in and 2" for the bump stop. My home made lift kit can also be seen. It will be able to lift the front end 2" for battles against all speed bumps in the concrete djungle. It will help alot, since total ground clearance will be only 3,5".

    11. #491
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden
      I also gave the dry sump pump a long needed overhaul. It was leaking from litteraly every gasket, resulting in oily dirt all over the pump every time.
      It has seen it's best days, I decided to go for a rebuild rather than buying a new one (even though most you doubt it, this is still a really tight budget project).
      If Penske had good support, Barnes had even better. I think it was less than two hours mail exchange before all parts was packed and shipped.


      Taken apart:


      New gaskets, bearings, springs and stickers(!). I specially asked for the stickers :D


      I was going to have the housing reanodized, but they were coated with something so that failed. The inside wasn't even touched during the attempts of removing the old anodize.


      So I painted it instead, in cast iron grey. Black parts are anodized


      Putting everything back together...


      Also made new inlets on the scavenge side. There's no room at all for AN-fittings, so I'll have to use rubber hoses and hose clamps instead


      Final result. That feeling when you turn the gears... it's like night and day compared to before. Much tighter when you rotate the gears now than before.
      Let's just hope it doesn't leak anymore.

    12. #492
      Join Date
      Sep 2017
      Posts
      1
      Incredible Build! Wow!! Does anyone know what he did to the front of his grill when the car was red? and what lower spoiler is that? I like those two modifications

    13. #493
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden

      It's time for final assembly so everything has been painted and coated in some way. Nice to have something else but the mustard-yellow primer on the dedione tube. Really hard to cover all areas with the paint gun, so I cheated and painted some hard-to-reach areas with a brush before.



      Some close ups. I've been pulling these things apart and put them together probably 20 times since they were built, so it was nice to finally putting the correct Nyloc nuts and tighten everything. Celebrated by marking all the heads that has been tightened.
      The e-brake cables are actually original Firebird 70-81 cables. Funny, since almost all other parts are home built/from other donor cars.



      half shaft angle came out pretty nice. It's roughly 3 degrees.
      The half shafts are temporary since they're shortened and rewelded. I hope they will make it through the test drive, and once I see that everything fits I'll order a proper setup.

      Attachment for brake cooling hose could be spotted in this pic, to the left of the halv shaft gaiter. Not the highest priority to finish right now, but it's nice to at least have the duct hose mounting point finished.


      And the winner of the longest-panhard-bar-ever-contest is...
      PH bar is adjustable with different holes in the dedione tube. In the body, various shims can be installed to it's perfectly level.


      Coil overs are mounted as close to the upright as possible. Suspension forces will not affect the dedione tube very much why it has been made in thinner tube than otherwise would have been required. Motion ratio is 0.98:1 in the rear (and 1:1 in the front!) which feels very satisfying for a nerdy engineer like me...



      Since it's almost impossible to get a proper shot of the entire rear suspension, here are some (old) CAD-pics instead.



    14. #494
      Join Date
      Apr 2014
      Location
      DFW, TX
      Posts
      112
      Country Flag: United States
      Now that's just COOL as Can BE!
      1978 Pontiac Trans Am Y88-R, DSE suspension, LS3/T56
      2002 Firehawk by SLP, LS1, 1LE

    15. #495
      Join Date
      Apr 2001
      Location
      The City of Fountains
      Posts
      15,638
      Country Flag: United States
      Looks awesome!

      One thing I notices is that you didn't use a flexible line to the rear caliper. I realize that you have a fixed caliper and a big bearing for the hub, but isn't there still some flex, especially when racing, etc...?

      Andrew
      1970 GTO Version 2.0
      1967 Cougar build
      GM High-Tech Performance feature
      My YouTube Channel Please Subscribe!
      Instagram @projectgattago
      Dr. EFI
      I deliver what EFI promises.
      Remote Holley EFI tuning.
      Please get in touch if I can be of service.

      "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her

    16. #496
      Join Date
      Oct 2011
      Location
      Maryland
      Posts
      129
      Country Flag: United States
      ^^^^ and wouldnt that make changing brake pads a little harder.. unless u unscrew some of the brake brackets.

    17. #497
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden
      You don't need to remove the caliper to change pads. Just remove the sprint and pull the pads out.

      Quote Originally Posted by andrewb70 View Post
      Looks awesome!

      One thing I notices is that you didn't use a flexible line to the rear caliper. I realize that you have a fixed caliper and a big bearing for the hub, but isn't there still some flex, especially when racing, etc...?

      Andrew
      Thanks!

      The entire dedione will also flex. I'm using lines there...
      The calipers (and the spindle) are fix so there are not much things moving except for all the flexing. I think the tube itself will flex more than this area.
      Camber can also be adjusted, but I didn't really bother to use hose for that reason. The caliper moves less than 0,05" from 1-3 camber which really isn't enough to motivate a hose and added complexity.
      (Spindle rotates around the bolt in center of the tube when camber is adjusted, so there's not very much stress on the brake tube)
      Camber is adjusted on the upper mount:




      Quote Originally Posted by 74fb461 View Post
      Incredible Build! Wow!! Does anyone know what he did to the front of his grill when the car was red? and what lower spoiler is that? I like those two modifications
      I just covered the upper grilles with carbon fiber plates. Could be done with sheet metal or whatever you have.
      The spoiler is a stock one, but I removed the license plate mount.

    18. #498
      Join Date
      Apr 2001
      Location
      The City of Fountains
      Posts
      15,638
      Country Flag: United States
      I realise that the spindles don't move independent of the dedion. This is no different than when we build solid axle rear ends. But if you look around, most people run a hard-line to the end of the axle tube and then have a short flex line to the caliper. This is to accommodate rotor/hub/bearing flex. Plus there is flex at the point where the spindle attaches to the dedion. It may not be much, but at 100 mph going around corners with big slicks, things will move around. But if you're cool with it....

      Andrew
      1970 GTO Version 2.0
      1967 Cougar build
      GM High-Tech Performance feature
      My YouTube Channel Please Subscribe!
      Instagram @projectgattago
      Dr. EFI
      I deliver what EFI promises.
      Remote Holley EFI tuning.
      Please get in touch if I can be of service.

      "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her

    19. #499
      Join Date
      Dec 2015
      Location
      Ruhr-Area, NRW, Germany
      Posts
      313
      Country Flag: Germany
      Quote Originally Posted by andrewb70 View Post
      I realise that the spindles don't move independent of the dedion. This is no different than when we build solid axle rear ends. But if you look around, most people run a hard-line to the end of the axle tube and then have a short flex line to the caliper. This is to accommodate rotor/hub/bearing flex. Plus there is flex at the point where the spindle attaches to the dedion. It may not be much, but at 100 mph going around corners with big slicks, things will move around. But if you're cool with it....

      Andrew
      And in addition to that, r&r of the caliper will be a lot easier and would not require to open the brake lines which in turn requires bleeding.
      In case you have to swap rotors or a wheel bearing, etc. ...


      1985 Dodge Power Ram W250 3/4t 360/518/241
      2005 Dodge Ram 1500 SRT-10 505/T56/D60 small upgrades

    20. #500
      Join Date
      Aug 2002
      Location
      Sweden
      Posts
      882
      Country Flag: Sweden
      Quote Originally Posted by andrewb70 View Post
      I realise that the spindles don't move independent of the dedion. This is no different than when we build solid axle rear ends. But if you look around, most people run a hard-line to the end of the axle tube and then have a short flex line to the caliper. This is to accommodate rotor/hub/bearing flex. Plus there is flex at the point where the spindle attaches to the dedion. It may not be much, but at 100 mph going around corners with big slicks, things will move around. But if you're cool with it....

      Andrew
      Good point Andrew. Thanks!
      I'll add that to my improve list!

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