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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    402
    Country Flag: United States

    Found those clamps @ Northern Tools

    Here you go $10 for 4. Not as good a deal as HF but I couldn't find them from HF online.

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...1757_200381757



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    dexter mi
    Posts
    18
    I just thought I might add a little trick . Before you notch down that weld on a warped panel . Get yourself a hammer and dolley . Hit just the weld . The weld is the only thing that shrunk . You can also use a few tack welds to shrink up an area if it "oil cans" .

    I love the tape templates ! Great post

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ramona, Ca. San Diego area
    Posts
    1,309
    Country Flag: United States
    Great tip.


    What I do to is hold a piece of metal behind the hole you need to patch or repair and use a can of black paint and lightly fog over the hole. This will leave a pattern on the new piece behind the hole. Then you cut along the paint line.
    67 Camaro convertible (Jinx)

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Kathleen, GA
    Posts
    159
    definitley a "why didnt I think of that " idea..spray paint is also a very good idea....excellent tips !

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Durham,NC
    Posts
    666
    Country Flag: United States
    Spray paint?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    muggy midwest
    Posts
    534
    Country Flag: United States
    great tip! I do a lot of electrical experiments and through that I became aware of super strong rare earth magnets and those are what I use to keep small patch panels tight and flush while butt-welding. They work great too!
    "...if at first you don't succeed, try again.
    If you still don't succeed, then quit-no sense being a damn fool about it..."
    -W.C. Fields

    HARNESSWORX
    (formerly gmachinz)

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    181
    Great Tip!!!!! Thanks so much

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    111
    Country Flag: United States
    Have always used the tape method, never thought of spray paint. Another great way of getting it done.
    Nick
    68' Camaro RS/SS - Current Project
    72' Nova SS

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Country Flag: United States
    One thing I suggest is instead of sharp cornes use round ones as much as possible. You produce less heat in round corners then you do in sharp corners of patch panels.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    51
    Country Flag: United States
    Quote Originally Posted by cadwiz View Post
    One thing I suggest is instead of sharp cornes use round ones as much as possible. You produce less heat in round corners then you do in sharp corners of patch panels.
    Exactly. Round those corners off and don't be shy. Think about how the corner piece of the lasagna is always more done than the casserole that's cooked in a round dish. That hard corner is subject to a lot more heat than if you round it off with at least a 1/2" radius.

    Another point that someone brought up is to hammer and dolly the weld seam. After you weld that piece in, dress the weld till it's about flush with the patch and surrounding surface. The heat affected zone (HAZ) is where all the shrinkage has occured. On firewalls and floors where there is lots of shape and contour to maintain strength, the shrinkage will be almost unnoticeable. On surfaces that are flatter, the shrinkage will cause oil canning. Hammer and dolly on the seam only to stretch that HAZ back to a more relaxed state. Careful not to stretch too much, because you can go too far the other way. Firewalls and floors are great places to practice this technique for more delicate, flatter panels.
    Adam Moyer
    '69 Cutlass "S"

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    163
    Country Flag: Australia
    Literally just seeing that tape idea has opened my eyes.

    I thought metal work would be harder than I thought to make weird shaped patches, but if you are using a light gauge metal, you can get a rough shape by shaping the new metal over the damaged/rusted metal, then use the tape method after cutting a patch section to transfer the shaped metal in.

    That is just a way I thought of doing it just then, and I am sure there are more "professional" ways out there.
    But that just solved one of my little brain barriers. lol

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    Posts
    187
    Country Flag: United States
    I wish I would have seen this idea about 20 years ago. I knew about the paint one.
    63 Biscayne
    Schwartz Performance Chassis

    My build thread: https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...ht=#post916553

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    34
    Country Flag: United States
    i have used the paint method before, but never thought of the tape method. i think its a better way to go. here's another if not mentioned before, use small magnets to hold the panel in place while tack welding only, but remove them after as they will disrupt the electrical wave pattern and mess up your weld.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    5
    Country Flag: Canada
    nice work (smashin my head)

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oswego il
    Posts
    936
    Country Flag: United States
    Another quick tip, get a foot of pipe in several diameters, weld a flat plate to it to clamp in your vice. Quick hammer forms for putting some shape into a patch.

    I also ground, filed 3 1 foot long sections of the edge of my welding table to different radii. 1 sharp, 1 medium, 1 large. Makes real quick bending simple with a couple clamps and gradual hammering.

    I have a couple of hardwood 2 x 8 sections with male or female "beads" router'd into them. Work well to replicate the form when patching. I use flat plates ground to radii, welded to a short pipe, hit with a hammer to form. Pipe has a slot ground in, with the plates slipped into the pipe before welding. You don't strike these very hard, Gradual forming into the beads, making sure it lines up.

    trusty piece of railroad rail about 18 inches long, has different shapes on each corner, my town had a large railroad repair yard for about 70 years, so there's a lot of this stuff around, not sure where to get it now.

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