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  1. #1
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    Default how to take GREAT photos

    i'm starting this thread to get some tips for taking great photos. if the professional photographers on the board could post some of their best pics, how they took the photo, camera make/model, time of day the photo was shot (i'm finding the angle of the sun can make the biggest difference), etc., then i think we could have a pretty decent thread. also, amatuer photographers, like me, can post pics they've found on the internet and "ask the pros" how such photos were shot. i'll start.

    what time of day was this first photo shot? also, is it overcast outside? is taking a photo when it's overcast a good idea?



    i know the below pic has something to do w/ exposure rate, but that's where my knowledge ends. how did he do this?





  2. #2
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    Nov 2008
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    I'm not a pro photographer by any means but ill just throw in what i have heard. First thing I have heard is that sunrise and sunset are the best time to take pics, not to sure why, so maybe someone could elaborate on that?

    second is about the cameras, I'm sure most/all the pros are using DSLR cameras, which can get expensive, the best thing for amatures would be to get a smaller camera with different options, setting and adjustments. I sold cameras for a few months around christmas time, so thats just my input of what i picked up when i was there.

  3. #3
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    Second pic you hold the shutter open longer. Anything that moves becomes a blur. I believe this is how they get those shots of cars on an interstate where their headlights and tailights look continuous.
    Andrew
    1987 Olds Cutlass Supreme FE3X Clone
    EFI455/T56/9" w/ 4.30 gears
    __________________________________________________ __


  4. #4
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    you sure they didnt blast by with the firetruck and he got it just at the right time..lol..cool pics indeed i just point and shoot and hope they come oput ok..lol
    Darrin Stalnecker
    1969 Camaro Convert full pt pr
    2007 Corvette Supercharged
    1968 Camaro LS1 T56
    http://www.fquick.com/dropit69

  5. #5
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    Apr 2005
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    Albuquerque
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    How about some tips on shooting indoors at a car show with the overhead lights, children and funny barriers roping off cars.



    Mick
    I'm from the government, I'm here to re-distribute your wealth

  6. #6
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    Dec 2006
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    Edmonton, AB, Canada
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    One of the things that can make or break a picture for me, is background clutter. You now that picture, where it's the coolest car in the world except in the background is the guy's old toilet he just threw out the backdoor, some old gardening tools, the garbage cans, the dogs tail, the neighbour peering over the fence, all that stuff bugs me. That first picture of the Vette is good for me, nothing really distracts you from looking at the car, except that panel leaning up beside the door.... Anyways, it's a great background that's not too busy. I try to opt for a not busy background... I'm no pro, just picky...
    Colin
    1950 Pontiac 12.82@105
    1999 GTP

  7. #7
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    The back ground is great in the first shot but the reflection in the paint is off the map. I am no pro but I have a Nikon D80 and have some good shots to share. My best work is usually at dusk or after and with a slow shutter speed.


    Todd

  8. #8
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    Go with a nice DSLR. I purchased a used Nikon D70, and I absolutely love it! The nice thing about digital is that you can shoot as many pics as you want without spending extra money. Then, just delete the ones that look bad.

    Shiny Side Up!
    Bill
    Bill Kistner
    Check out my blog and the latest installment of my current project "In the Company of Devils" at: www.WilliamKElliott.com.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProTouring442 View Post
    Go with a nice DSLR. I purchased a used Nikon D70, and I absolutely love it! The nice thing about digital is that you can shoot as many pics as you want without spending extra money. Then, just delete the ones that look bad.

    Shiny Side Up!
    Bill
    Agree, I have a Cannon 10D & a 30D, they have interchangeable lenses that work with the SLR film bodies. And I just bought an 8 Gig card for $22 & it will hold more pictures that I can probably take in a week.

    The original pics up top of the vette, the first was either taken at disk or dawn, at the time of the day when the sunlight is not direct harsh light. It is filtered through the clouds, could have been an overcast day too. It makes it like a soft box to difuse the light. The second pic, the camera was on a tripod with a long shutter speed & obviously the firetruck was moving which shows the blur, or movement.
    Scot
    86 Monte SS
    Soon to get a near 500hp LS2/T56
    https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...getting-an-LS2

  10. #10

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    I'd say for most of you guys that are looking for a high performance camera DSLR but don't want to break the bank get the Nikon D40 or D60. I love my D40.


    The pic with the fire truck is a truck moving by and the shutter speed slowed way down. Also best way to describe a pic like this is where you see a waterfall and the water looks all blurry and white. To put in layman's terms you are taking a picture of something that happens for 5 seconds and making it one still shot.

  11. #11
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    Here is a shot like mulisha00 is referring to. Shutter speed was set to around 15 seconds with aperature at f22 (tiny)


    Scot
    86 Monte SS
    Soon to get a near 500hp LS2/T56
    https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...getting-an-LS2

  12. #12
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    Looking at the 2 corvette pics, I would say: avoid to catch your reflection
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crfnkxyIv_o


    -79 Trans Am Special Edition with a 7.2 engine and 20" Boyd Smoothie II
    -64 Hi-tech Squareback

    Location: France

  13. #13
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    Very nice French Tranny!
    Last edited by Procharmo; 03-26-2009 at 03:37 PM. Reason: html

  14. #14
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    Dusk is always the sweet light for good photos, but sometimes you can't help it and have to take photos during the middle of the day. The best thing you can do is find some shade, it will soften the paint and make it look better. You can also grab a polarizing filter for additional help.

    For example: the paint on my car is garbage, but in a well planned photo using a polarizer at dusk it doesn't look nearly as bad.

  15. #15
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  16. #16
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    Thanks for the tips, I've been working to pay attention on the pictures I take and learn from them.

    There is a warehouse district near my office that is for the most part very well worn out, but within the area are pockets of renewed office fronts that seem to make a good background.. this one has some contrast color, the black logo overhang, as well as cracked concrete.
    http://www.hubgarage.com/mygarage/AndrewnTX
    1988 Ford Mustang LX 5.8L Vortech
    1956 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L
    1961 Ford Econoline Pick Up 250CI "Stovebolt" 6
    1963 Ford Falcon Sprint Hardtop - sold Jan 2010

  17. #17
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    Ha after reading the Popular HotRodding link, I break most of those tips!! Well here's one w/ parking lot stripes... and a few other no-no's.. but I sort of like how it turned out...
    http://www.hubgarage.com/mygarage/AndrewnTX
    1988 Ford Mustang LX 5.8L Vortech
    1956 Ford Thunderbird 5.0L
    1961 Ford Econoline Pick Up 250CI "Stovebolt" 6
    1963 Ford Falcon Sprint Hardtop - sold Jan 2010

  18. #18
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    And look beyond the subject matter. In a couple of the pics in this thread, there's signs, poles, and other detritus poking up and out. This stuff clutters the scene and is the first thing I'm drawn to.

    Turn the front wheels so they're angled and the viewer can see some of the outside portion. Sunrise and sunset are the best time to take photographs as it's the best light. Minimal shadows as the sun is behind the subject, not angled or directly on top which washes everything out and produces glare. Morning and evening light is softer.

    And anything's possible with PhotoShop ...

    Here's one I took in the early morning hours (about 7am) coming up the hill to Laguna Seca in my '73. I was driving about 30 mph or so, saw the hillside and the car's shadow, and took the picture. Didn't crash and that's the good part. Kinda interesting photo and the best part is the camera was a little Canon S500. You don't need high-end camera gear to get good results.



    Here's some random shots from the Nikon D80 and they're taken at various times of the day. The autocross shots were later in the day and it was overcast (much better color saturation then).











    Cheers,
    Mary Pozzi
    mpozzi . . . '73 Camaro RS, '69 Camaro SCCA/Trans-Am vintage racer, and a 1989 R7U 1LE Players Challenge car.

    "STICK, you B*TCH!!!!!!"

    "It's not a horse. You can't train it!! "


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpozzi View Post
    You don't need high-end camera gear to get good results.
    Mary Pozzi
    I heartily second this. Too often people invest a bunch of money in a camera and almost no time in learning how everything works. I just got back from the 3rd day of the Long Beach Grand Prix and I'm very happy with how my pictures have turned out so far. Also, I was absolutely livid when a "professional" credentialed photographer would take up a trackside window with his fancy rig and huge lense only to take utterly terrible pictures. More often, the credentialed photographers were quite good.

    Here are a few examples of my friend's pictures taken with an ancient and cheap Kodak CX7430, a 4 megapixel camera with 3x optcal zoom. These images are completely unedited.



    Note that the blur from the panning makes the people "growing" out of the Ferrari less obtrusive.






    I should note that this was at dusk and the lighting was terrible.







    Now, at the same time I was trying to get good pics with a 3.1 megapixel no optical zoom HP camera. In this shot, I realized the camera could not focus quickly enough as a followed the car, so I pre-focused where the car would be when I took the picture and then when about panning as usual. The jellyfish lense flare is ugly in this pic, but was cropped out of course in the final version.


    So, quick summary, understand the how's and why's of your camera to get better results.


    And to clarify, none of these pictures are from this year's grand prix . . . we've both since upgraded after running our old cameras into the ground . . . or in my case, Lake Tahoe.
    Brett H.

    1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am
    1991 Mazda Miata
    2005 Ford Mustang GT

    1987 Ford Mustang GT - Sold 06-29-2014
    1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera - RIP 9-17-2011
    1992 Chevrolet Corvette - Sold 10-12-2017

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 79-TA View Post
    And to clarify, none of these pictures are from this year's grand prix . . . we've both since upgraded after running our old cameras into the ground . . . or in my case, Lake Tahoe.
    How did you lose your camera in Lake Tahoe?

    Don't forget guys, the coolest thing about a DSLR is that you can take hundreds of pictures and it doesn't cost you any more. So get creative, play with settings, time of day, orientation to your light source, etc. When I go to a cruise-in or car show, I take dozens of pictures, and delete at least half of them when I get them on the computer.

    Shiny Side Up!
    Bill
    Bill Kistner
    Check out my blog and the latest installment of my current project "In the Company of Devils" at: www.WilliamKElliott.com.

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