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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70 Chevelle View Post
    Back to the original subject. For those of us that are photographically challenged what is a good "idiot proof " camera?
    Photos in the shop always come out like crap for me. I've tried making adjustments but nothing seems to help.
    There almost isn't an idiot proof camera unfortunately. :( If you can take a great composition of a car, you can make it look just as good if not better than someone with a great camera. When it comes to photography, most photo issues can't be solved by throwing money at the problem. But if you do have some dough, I would invest in at least a Canon Rebel or Canon 50D or 60D to start out with if you are serious about doing pro-sumer photography. If you need one that's consumer and compact friendly I suggest the Canon G11. It also does hi-def video. Or if you have money to burn, get yourself a Canon 5D Mark II.



  2. #42
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas69 View Post
    Love the 3rd Photo Todd! Looks great! These are one of those great examples of driving out to that cool place makes a difference.

    Hey Guys, another thing to consider is if you do get yourself a Digital SLR, consider a good Lens. If you like wide outdoor shots like these sometimes having a wide angle like a 16mm-35mm range is helpful.

  3. #43
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstGenZq8 View Post
    i have a hard time getting photos to look decent in the day time, but others have success. how was this photo taken?

    A vignette was added. Some sharpening was done, but mostly the quality is attributed to a good positioning of what angle the photo was taken in addition to the fact that the haze softened the tones and shadows. You can make just about any photo look good if you spend some time mastering the color, sharpness and highlighting details of the photo. But the best thing to try and do the first time is to come up with a good composition.

    There's a ton of programs out there that will do this but the 2 best are Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Lightroom.

  4. #44
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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas69 View Post
    this is awesome! got me the bigger pic of it? need new background
    Kevin S. (overseas in Germany)

    1972 Buick Skylark GS 455 (Stage 1 Clone)

  5. #45
    Interesting topic. I'm not sure I have a whole lot to offer.

    But, here's a few of my better car images.

    I have a few others... but I can't share those with you just yet... ;)








  6. #46
    Here's one just because my wife HATES This photo! :D


  7. #47
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    Jul 2009
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    New Jersey
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    Random neat shot of my car, its got lots of issues and flaws which I'd be glad to discuss. Just shoot me a pm. While this looks ok, its more of a lesson in what not to do.
    RJ Cilurso
    67 Camaro with a few things bolted to it
    12 Camaro with a few things bolted to it
    50 Chevy 5 window p/u with a few things unbolted
    USAF

  8. #48
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    Dec 2009
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by AintQik View Post


    Random neat shot of my car, its got lots of issues and flaws which I'd be glad to discuss. Just shoot me a pm. While this looks ok, its more of a lesson in what not to do.

    This one would in fact be cool if your front tire was turned towads the viewer, thus showing the wheel and brakes. The cloud reflections and low light make forn an intresting adition on an otherwise completely black subject and add to the picture.

    I work for a monthly magazine over here in Mexico as freelancer, I contact, photgraph and write the monthly muscle car section, and have been having way too much fun doing so. I have some basic equipment, an XTI with three lenses, a tripod and a remote shooter are all I use to get the work done, and I've done pretty good so far:















    if there is any way I can help, or any question, feel free (:

  9. #49
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    Sep 2006
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    Henderson,NV
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    Quote Originally Posted by CruizinKev View Post
    this is awesome! got me the bigger pic of it? need new background
    Appreciate it, one of my best that's for sure. I do have the original I can email you. PM me your address....
    Todd

  10. #50
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    Feb 2003
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    Houston, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstGenZq8 View Post
    i'm starting this thread to get some tips for taking great photos. if the professional photographers on the board could post some of their best pics, how they took the photo, camera make/model, time of day the photo was shot (i'm finding the angle of the sun can make the biggest difference), etc., then i think we could have a pretty decent thread. also, amatuer photographers, like me, can post pics they've found on the internet and "ask the pros" how such photos were shot. i'll start.

    what time of day was this first photo shot? also, is it overcast outside? is taking a photo when it's overcast a good idea?



    i know the below pic has something to do w/ exposure rate, but that's where my knowledge ends. how did he do this?

    Sorry I missed this thread, since those are my pics above. They weren't really a "pro" photo session of mine, just driving around Houston and snapping pics. No props or external lighting used, just my Canon 30D and some lenses.

    First pic was taken mid-day on an overcast day. It was very cloudy, so no direct sunlight or shadows. I always use a tripod when shooting cars, even on my driveway. Polarizing filter used on the top section of the car, to reduce reflection/glare and overexposure from the white clouds above.

    Second pic was exactly like others mentioned, it was controlling the shutter speed. Firetruck was leaving to go on a call when I snapped it, about 3 seconds if I remember correctly. Also used a polarizing filter along the side of the car to eliminate bright reflections of the concrete on the side of the car.

    One format I still rarely see used is the overhead shot. All it takes is an 8-foot ladder and some large concrete area. This is still one of my favorite angles to view a car.





    And, I still enjoy the car-to-car rolling shots.





    Late evening shot, using orange gradient filter over lens for this one.



    Any questions, I'll be glad to answer. I'm not one of those typical snobby magazine shooters who keeps my secrets to myself

    Tony
    Co-Founder, LS1TECH.com


    Forged Wheel Dealer, Contact me for a quote!
    www.DV8Motoring.com

  11. #51
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    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
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    One thing I almost always do these days is to turn take the flash of AUTO and turn it on...so it can fill in some light....even in the day at a car show using the flash helps.

    This is my favourite shot of my Trans Am...taken just after sun up on a winters morning. I like the almost "sales brouchure" quality of the pic...with the people walking their dogs on the beach behind the car. Was taken with a small 6Mg pixel Olympus auto camera....which I've just replaced so now I have to learn how the new one works...which is also an Olympus, but has more manual controls.


    this one was taken at another location probably 30 minutes after the one above...but I think it needed to wait a little longer for the sun to be a bit higher - needs more light around the front of the car I think.
    Regards,
    Leigh

    Sydney, Australia
    1971 Firebird 455

    https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...Project/page27

  12. #52
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    Jan 2010
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    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas69 View Post
    The back ground is great in the first shot but the reflection in the paint is off the map. I am no pro but I have a Nikon D80 and have some good shots to share. My best work is usually at dusk or after and with a slow shutter speed.


    Your second picture is perfect. For your first one I advise the following techniques for everyone:
    The basic golden rule of photography is the simplest is the best. The more simple you make a photo the better.

    For night shots I do some of the following (depending on what I want to see).
    1. either let the camera determine your best shutter speed or find what your preferred amount of light that you want entering the camera

    2. Depending on the lights in the photo you want to adjust your ISO. If you want those city lights to come out more then you want a higher ISO out of the camera to capture the intensity.

    3. Adjust your aperture to what you want the viewer to be focused on (this will get rid or the eye's tendency to find other objects in the background when they are blurred out). A higher number on the aperture means that it will keep more things in focus (like landscapes). and a smaller number will focus more closely on the desired object and blur out the background (like on of those macro photos of a flower).

    4. This is one of the most important things for night photos.. A tripod! No matter how hard you try you will not be able to keep steady and keep things in focus since at night you will have a slower shutter speed. make sure it is on a firm ground and you have a shutter button to push off of the camera or just simply set a 2 second or so timer so you pushing the button doesn't move the camera at all.

    5. don't use a flash outdoors when you have reflective objects such as that crisp clear coat . set you camera on a tripod or solid surface and let the camera do the work at capturing the light with that longer shutter speed.

    following these steps will overall improve the quality and values of your photo. A good photographer can make a junker a beauty. Good luck all! Any questions about cameras, bags, lenses, tripods, etc. can be answered through me if you have any!

  13. #53
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    Aug 2008
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    new braunfels, tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZZ430 View Post


    how in the heck was that top shot taken? in the second shot, does the photographer have the camera hard mounted or is it possible to take a picture like that w/o a stand?

  14. #54
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    Dec 2009
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by FirstGenZq8 View Post
    how in the heck was that top shot taken? in the second shot, does the photographer have the camera hard mounted or is it possible to take a picture like that w/o a stand?

    it was mounted using a car rig, basically a set of tubes attached with clamps or magnets or whatever to the car, which holds the camera in the other end, which will be shooting at a long exposure time... the car will move 1 meter at pushing speed but will look like it's doing 150 mph.


  15. #55
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    Jul 2007
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    Northern Virginia
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    Just found this thread, Very informative. Does anyone know how to do those watermarks in the corner of the pictures?
    Ray
    1996 Impala SS aka MistreSS (7800 original miles)
    LPE LT4 Heads/Intake
    Powerdyne Supercharger\T-56 Conversion

    MistreSS Updates: https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...light=mistress

  16. #56
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    Jul 2001
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    Detroit, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by 79-TA View Post
    Maybe we can make another thread on camera selection some day.
    In the digital realm you have regular and full frame imaging sensors. The full frame camera's and medium format cameras are the priciest. I don't know what everyone else here shoots but I have a regular imaging sensor on my Nikon D300. For me it's all the firepower I will need for a long time.

    Brand names....the 2 big dogs are Nikon and Canon and there is virtually no difference in the quality between the two. Both are used by professionals in ever facet of the photography business.

    I've been in the game for about 2 years now, I started with a little D40 DSLR Camera and graduated to the D300 just a few months ago.

    The camera body is important but what really matters in the end is the type of glass your using (glass meaning lenses). I have one prime lense in my Camera bag that I used to do portraits of my neice and the pics were nothing my old kit lenses could have pulled off.

    Good glass matters.
    1968 Pro-Touring Camaro LS1

    Project: Next Year
    - Start date; June '01
    - Completion; Sometime next year or the year after.....

  17. #57
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    Jul 2007
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    Olathe, KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by trapin View Post
    Good glass matters.
    Truer words have seldom been spoken. If you're on a budget and looking for a DSLR, get a moderately priced body and a good lens. The pics will come out worlds better than the latest body and mediocre kit lenses.

  18. #58
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    Oct 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by trapin View Post
    In the digital realm you have regular and full frame imaging sensors. The full frame camera's and medium format cameras are the priciest. I don't know what everyone else here shoots but I have a regular imaging sensor on my Nikon D300. For me it's all the firepower I will need for a long time.

    Brand names....the 2 big dogs are Nikon and Canon and there is virtually no difference in the quality between the two. Both are used by professionals in ever facet of the photography business.

    I've been in the game for about 2 years now, I started with a little D40 DSLR Camera and graduated to the D300 just a few months ago.

    The camera body is important but what really matters in the end is the type of glass your using (glass meaning lenses). I have one prime lense in my Camera bag that I used to do portraits of my neice and the pics were nothing my old kit lenses could have pulled off.

    Good glass matters.
    By regular sensor, Tony refers to cropped sensors. Without going into a dissertation, because of the shape of the chips and sensors, early D-SLR's (and many current ones) used a cropped sensor to ensure as much data was captured on the sensor. These are referred to as DX format in Nikon world.
    Nick DiPrenda

  19. #59
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    Jul 2010
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    8

    my 69




  20. #60
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    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ventura, CA
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    10
    A buddy of mine used my Z06 for some marketing of his audio business. The photographer shot these to my amazment on how he did this. He took over 100 shots at one agle, changing the lighting each time. Then he blended each shot till he came up with a compsite picture.






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