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    Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Join Date
      Feb 2013
      Posts
      755
      Country Flag: United States

      RetroSound or Classic Auto Sound?

      Or something I haven't found yet?

      Ended up having to rework (replace with another one I had) the lower dash bezel that holds the radio, wiper switch, etc. I think I've decided not to cut a DIN size hole in it and use a retro radio design instead.

      I probably* won't go overboard with stereo in this vehicle but need bluetooth and enough power to listen to music in a convertible. Have plans already for tweeters integrated into the windshield pillars but that's it, I swear. Oh, and drivers integrated into the rear side panels but not hitting the convertible top mechanism like the last clown show that was installed. And custom kick panels...crap.

    2. #2
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Location
      Tinley Park, IL
      Posts
      1,122
      Country Flag: United States
      Neither of those head units have the power you need on their own. You could wire them into an amp, or not use a head unit at all and get a bluetooth amp. Or an amp with a remote control and custom mount it, like would be used in a boat.

      https://www.crutchfield.com/g_120/Al...FBluetooth|Yes

      I have the non-blue tooth version of that mini Kenwood (I like to listen to CD's using the head unit) and it sounds great. I have Alpine speakers and a cheap powered sub behind the passenger seat.

      Nick ~
      1969 Cutlass

    3. #3
      Join Date
      Oct 2009
      Location
      CT.
      Posts
      738
      From personal experience both of those options are terrible. I now have two of these in my toys and Love them. http://www.outofsightaudio.com
      These just need power and ground, then run speaker wire to speakers and then run off your phone Bluetooth.



      Glenn

      1955 Chevy BelAir
      1951 Chevy 3100
      1987 Chevy Silverado

      My last project....
      https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...my-72-Maverick!!

    4. #4
      Join Date
      Feb 2013
      Posts
      755
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by HotRod47 View Post
      From personal experience both of those options are terrible. I now have two of these in my toys and Love them. http://www.outofsightaudio.com
      These just need power and ground, then run speaker wire to speakers and then run off your phone Bluetooth.
      Have not seen these before. I unfortunately still have to fill the dash with something so maybe it's an option other than a separate amp.

    5. #5
      Join Date
      Jul 2013
      Location
      N. Scottsdale
      Posts
      325
      Country Flag: United States
      I went with a RetroSound Long Beach in my 70 Firebird...wanted something that fits in the dash and doesn't look out of place...no complaints from friends who run these in front of a modest multichannel amp, quality speakers, and a small sub. If I have any issues, easy enough to swap out with a replacement or with something from Classic, AAR or a modernized factory radio.

    6. #6
      Join Date
      Jun 2016
      Location
      Upstate NY
      Posts
      41
      I used a Retrosound because it looked the best, had the decals available for the face. It sucks though. Power output is terrible, distorts when you get to about 28 on volume. Needs an amp for sure. It's just temperamental as all hell. Slightest wire connection issue shuts it down, or off.

    7. #7
      Join Date
      Jul 2010
      Location
      Clear Lake, Iowa
      Posts
      108
      Country Flag: United States
      I went with the Custom Autosound in my 80 Trans Am, I just wanted some background noise instead of silence, and like you just wanted to fill the hole in the dash without cutting it open. it's adequate for what it is, but if you want good sound it could really be improved with an amp and equalizer, it has all the inputs to add them.
      Joe Adams

    8. #8
      Join Date
      Sep 2017
      Posts
      653
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by JustJohn View Post
      Or something I haven't found yet?

      Ended up having to rework (replace with another one I had) the lower dash bezel that holds the radio, wiper switch, etc. I think I've decided not to cut a DIN size hole in it and use a retro radio design instead.

      I probably* won't go overboard with stereo in this vehicle but need bluetooth and enough power to listen to music in a convertible. Have plans already for tweeters integrated into the windshield pillars but that's it, I swear. Oh, and drivers integrated into the rear side panels but not hitting the convertible top mechanism like the last clown show that was installed. And custom kick panels...crap.
      I have a custom auto sound 630 radio for 67-68 Camaro has 4X75w power and I have the custom auto sound kick panels. Both new in box I won't be using.
      The stereo has the original look black faceplate
      TANKMASTERJ
      https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...touring-Camaro
      Jasons Toys
      67 Camaro build
      2000 HD Softail
      1989 CBR Hurricane anniversary edition

    9. #9
      Join Date
      Nov 2010
      Location
      Ventura County CA
      Posts
      544
      Country Flag: United States
      It's been very interesting reading threads like this on RetroSound vs Custom Autosound vs bluetooth amps / hidden radios. My experience is a bit dated, but I'll add it here along with plans for my next system.



      I had what was then the top-of-the-line Custom Autosound unit made in around 2001 or 2002, complete with an auto-reverse, auto-scan tape player and trunk-mounted CD changer. I don't think it had an aux input - at that time it was not a common thing, but they did sell aux-cassette tape adapters that would allow you to plug in a portable CD player or later on, an iPod. That radio worked great for about 10years running a pair of 3.5" in-dash speakers and pair of 6x9s directly from the unit, along with an amp and dual subwoofers in the trunk. I was happy with the sound and general quality of the unit. The CD changer worked great - it did not skip like most in-dash CD players of the era, but it was a bit annoying to pop the trunk to change out my tunes on longer trips. My how times have changed! Eventually I had two issues with the unit. First it developed an excessive power draw with the ignition off and later it completely stopped turning on at all. I contacted Custom Autosound and they repaired the unit free of charge, even though it was years out of warranty. That unfortunately only lasted a couple years and the unit would no longer turn on. Now it is a paperweight in my garage - I have no idea if it's repairable.

      Now it's 2022 and after researching the current options, I've decided to try the Retrosound Long Beach with external amps for both speakers and subwoofer. Custom Autosound would have my business still, were it not for the overlays that, in my opinion, make the LCD display hard to see. I decided against a Bluetooth amp because I wanted something integrated into the original radio location where I can quickly get to a knob and change volume or sources. There are Bluetooth amps that have wired controllers - I just don't think they would look as good as a head unit that fits the original location. Either way I think a physical set of knobs or buttons should be mandatory for quickly adjusting volume (ever turn on a car and get blasted with a previous volume setting?) and changing tracks while keeping eyes on the road. I chose the Long Beach over the Hermosa because it has a separate subwoofer RCA output and you can adjust the subwoofer level directly from the radio. I find this kind of feature helpful when changing among different kinds of music. I also decided to use an external amp to drive the speakers, because the Retrosound unit is very limited (25watts rms) and I've heard from others the sound quality out of the internal amp is poor at best. Custom Autosound has more power available directly out of the head unit, so it might be a better option when not using an external amp.

      I have gone without a radio for quite some time, but now in the era of cellphones, having a handsfree calling option and ability to stream music have become important. One thing I could not find much info about was how good the Bluetooth calling is with these units. If anyone can comment on their experience, I'd love to hear. My car is a bit noisy between the exhaust and wind noise. I will have to decide on a location for the microphone, so any input there would be appreciated. My initial thought is to run the wiring up the a-pillar and either mount it to the top of the a-pillar or run the wire along the windlace/headliner and position it under the rearview mirror.
      Clint - '70 Nova "restomod" cruiser & autocross family car