Enter your username:
Do you want to login or register?
  • Forgot your password?

    Login / Register



    Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Join Date
      Nov 2011
      Location
      Livermore, CA
      Posts
      171
      Country Flag: United States

      Double Pane Side Glass

      Forgive me if this is the wrong section but didn't seem to fit in interior and the main reason I'm considering this is to lower the solar heating to compensate for having a smaller compressor due to suspension clearance with setting the engine back.
      Back to puttering on my '64 Riviera and in the process of fixing the floors I did a total dumb-dumb and didn't cover the side glass so now it's full of pitting from grinding splatter. Since it's just flat plate glass, replacing it isn't terribly difficult despite the off mainstream nature of the car. Now since I've been around here last I breifly owned a 98 Mercedes CL600 that the state of CA ruined by making me pay $1000 to get the title because it had be sitting abandoned for 5yrs when the owner died. While I was driving it around to test out the various systems and get the smog monitors to set if I did end up registering it I noticed just how quiet and cool the double glazing (double pane glass) made the car. I went as far as eyeballing putting the rear windows out of the CL600 in the Riviera but they were far larger. Poking around on the internet I found a company that does custom double glazing (One Day Glass) that can make the oddball shapes needed for the door and quarter glass. Overall it's not that much more expensive than laminated glass (Sanders Repo Glass) which is the other option I was considering for the same thermal and noise reasons.

      Yes it'll be heavier and thicker but it's a Riviera with no cage; I'm not exactly super worried about the weight and 10/10ths performance. The door skins on the Riviera bolt on from the outside so adjusting them for a thicker piece of glass isn't a huge deal for the doors, quarter glass might get a bit more complicated but they do have a huge piece of trim cover the body opening as well. Already thinking of going with fiber glass door skins which would buy back some of the weight.

      Thoughts from the crowd?
      Central TEXAS Sleeper
      Experimental Physicist

      '64 Riviera T-type: 4.1L Buick Turbo6, 4L80E, L67 OBDII SEFI swap

      ROA# 9790

    2. #2
      Join Date
      Apr 2010
      Location
      Jersey Shore
      Posts
      691
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by CTX-SLPR View Post
      Forgive me if this is the wrong section but didn't seem to fit in interior and the main reason I'm considering this is to lower the solar heating to compensate for having a smaller compressor due to suspension clearance with setting the engine back.
      Back to puttering on my '64 Riviera and in the process of fixing the floors I did a total dumb-dumb and didn't cover the side glass so now it's full of pitting from grinding splatter. Since it's just flat plate glass, replacing it isn't terribly difficult despite the off mainstream nature of the car. Now since I've been around here last I breifly owned a 98 Mercedes CL600 that the state of CA ruined by making me pay $1000 to get the title because it had be sitting abandoned for 5yrs when the owner died. While I was driving it around to test out the various systems and get the smog monitors to set if I did end up registering it I noticed just how quiet and cool the double glazing (double pane glass) made the car. I went as far as eyeballing putting the rear windows out of the CL600 in the Riviera but they were far larger. Poking around on the internet I found a company that does custom double glazing (One Day Glass) that can make the oddball shapes needed for the door and quarter glass. Overall it's not that much more expensive than laminated glass (Sanders Repo Glass) which is the other option I was considering for the same thermal and noise reasons.

      Yes it'll be heavier and thicker but it's a Riviera with no cage; I'm not exactly super worried about the weight and 10/10ths performance. The door skins on the Riviera bolt on from the outside so adjusting them for a thicker piece of glass isn't a huge deal for the doors, quarter glass might get a bit more complicated but they do have a huge piece of trim cover the body opening as well. Already thinking of going with fiber glass door skins which would buy back some of the weight.

      Thoughts from the crowd?
      Tint the glass instead... it wonít be as acoustically beneficial as the double pane, but will reject more solar energy, likely fit better, and wonít add any notable weight.
      -Chris
      '69 Corvette
      '55 Chevy Hardtop
      AutoWorks Middletown, NJ
      @autoworksnj for corvette and shop car pics
      https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...e-Build-Thread

    3. #3
      Join Date
      Oct 2014
      Location
      DFW, Texas
      Posts
      422
      Country Flag: United States
      I agree with the above and just recommend using ceramic tint. You'll get the solar benefits at least.

      The science project behind making all new glass work right doesn't sound like it's worth the reward to me.
      1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
      1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
      2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

    4. #4
      Join Date
      Sep 2010
      Location
      Martinez, CA
      Posts
      134
      Country Flag: United States
      Plus as flat as the glass looks, I doubt it’s truly flat. One Day glass doesn’t mention anything about dual pane for automotive use either. Did you talk with them?
      1966 Chevelle, 3.6L/217 CI, 4 cam direct injected V6, 6 speed auto, full Hotchkis suspension, 4 wheel Wilwood discs, white w/red interior, cowl hood. 3260 lbs w/full tank. Built for 35 mpg. So far 32.

    5. #5
      Join Date
      Nov 2011
      Location
      Livermore, CA
      Posts
      171
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by 67-LS1 View Post
      Plus as flat as the glass looks, I doubt itís truly flat. One Day glass doesnít mention anything about dual pane for automotive use either. Did you talk with them?
      They're definitely just flat plate glass pieces. I've not talked to them about using it in an automotive application as it was mainly a thought experiment and I'm not ready to make any orders till I wrap up the rest of the interior work and maybe the paint.
      Central TEXAS Sleeper
      Experimental Physicist

      '64 Riviera T-type: 4.1L Buick Turbo6, 4L80E, L67 OBDII SEFI swap

      ROA# 9790

    6. #6
      Join Date
      Sep 2010
      Location
      Martinez, CA
      Posts
      134
      Country Flag: United States
      Well Iím curious. When you do proceed, keep us posted. It would be a great up grade.
      1966 Chevelle, 3.6L/217 CI, 4 cam direct injected V6, 6 speed auto, full Hotchkis suspension, 4 wheel Wilwood discs, white w/red interior, cowl hood. 3260 lbs w/full tank. Built for 35 mpg. So far 32.

    7. #7
      Join Date
      Nov 2018
      Posts
      294
      Country Flag: United States
      Forget the naysayers. Listen to the crowd and you'll end up with a red 69 Camaro with a 350 just like everyone else. I say give the glass company a call and discuss it. The worst that can happen is they tell you they can't make what you want. I hope you still have the old glass, because you can send that to them to use as a template for the dual pane stuff.

      I also wouldn't worry too much about the smaller compressor. Modern compressors are far more efficient than the huge compressors from the 70s, and likely will perform better, not worse. But if it's a concern, look into putting automotive Thinsulate in the car, or Aerogel if your budget will stretch. You can also pull compressor efficiency charts for the factory compressor and the one you have to compare performance. You just need to figure out the actual company that made both to get the efficiency charts. It was likely Frigidaire for the original compressor, and Sanden for the newer one.

    8. #8
      Join Date
      Sep 2007
      Posts
      409
      I'm all for trying something outside-the-box.

      But I think you may be overestimating the effect of the double windows alone. By 1998 noise control had touched most aspects of car design, particularly on a Benz like that. The aero of the body. Resonance frequencies cause by the steel shapes of the parts. They used heavy sound deadening under EVERYTHING. The heat/AC system is designed to operate more quietly. They were starting to use two layers of rubber weatherstripping seals for the door opening. Etc.


      As for the cooler temps, I agree with the suggestion to tint the glass with good modern ceramic film. It blocks certain wavelengths better than older tints. You can get the cooling effect of a dark tint but it looks like a lighter shade to the human eye.

    9. #9
      Join Date
      Apr 2010
      Location
      Jersey Shore
      Posts
      691
      Country Flag: United States
      Iím all for keeping up with the modern building techniques, but there are certain things that are worth it, and some that are not. In this case, I donít think double pane glass will benefit this car at all. Think about the modern cars that actually use and benefit from double pane glass. They go down the road in almost silence. Like Mikedc said, they are aerodynamically designed to reduce wind noise everywhere. The rest of the car is silent. They are chasing fractions of a decibel by using the double pane glass. The glass is double gasketed on the interior and exterior panels and is held in the window channel with usually felt, not the whiskers found on many cars of this era.
      Donít get me wrong, Iíd love to see it come to fruition, but I really think the time, money and effort could be far better utilized on different ways to reduce interior noise.
      I have an audio tuning microphone that you can plug into your phone and watch real-time frequency and db readings. You can drive around and see what frequencies are most prominent, and deal with those. Then start moving the microphone around the cabin to find sound ďhotspotsĒ and start dealing with those. I think youíll find the glass is pretty low on the hotspot list. Floors, firewall, wheel wells, and INSIDE the door are typical noisy areas. Iíve been studying build techniques of Bentley, Mercedes/maybach, bmw, (older) jags, etc... the interior sound engineering is so much more than just dynamatting the hell out of a car. Panel fitment and affixing, materials selection, panel composition all contributes to interior noise. Companies now are realizing that they can cheap out on sound deadening because A) itís heavy and not good for mpg, and B) many high end cars utilize active sound cancellations via the stereo and microphones in the car. That late 90ís CL600 was probably a fantastic point of study for interior sound deadening design.

      -Chris
      '69 Corvette
      '55 Chevy Hardtop
      AutoWorks Middletown, NJ
      @autoworksnj for corvette and shop car pics
      https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...e-Build-Thread