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    Results 41 to 48 of 48
    1. #41
      Join Date
      May 2018
      Location
      San Diego County
      Posts
      64
      Country Flag: United States
      will you be running swaybar with these?
      Yes, absolutely. We designed the mounting brackets to accommodate virtually all of the existing commercially available units, and will be also designing our own in the future, which will (of course) be highly adjustable.
      Mark Magers

      Founder and Principal, Lateral Dynamics LLC
      [email protected]
      lateral-dynamics.com

      One tenth of a second on the race track is often the difference between first place, and fourth.

    2. #42
      Join Date
      Jan 2005
      Posts
      43
      Any updates?

    3. #43
      Join Date
      May 2018
      Location
      San Diego County
      Posts
      64
      Country Flag: United States
      Here are a few shots of the revised UCA mounting system in the cabin area. Some good practical advice pointed us towards a better solution than the previous "boot" approach, a simple but effective change resulted. Instead of having several adjustment points as on the "Competition" version, we elected to have one for the Touring approach, it's a set and forget (we still have two options for the rear mounting point of the UCA, shown in earlier pictures on this thread). The new brackets and cover drop slightly below the floor pan, allowing full perimeter tack welding/sealing. While it wasn't necessary, this also made the forward UCA mount stiffer - due to the additional bracing from the actual sheet cover - in the load path direction. Simple, effective, easy to install.
      Attached Images Attached Images      
      Mark Magers

      Founder and Principal, Lateral Dynamics LLC
      [email protected]
      lateral-dynamics.com

      One tenth of a second on the race track is often the difference between first place, and fourth.

    4. #44
      Join Date
      May 2018
      Location
      San Diego County
      Posts
      64
      Country Flag: United States
      Here are a few shots of the final setup. This is what we would consider to be a pretty aggressive road ride height, rear rocker height is just below 8" (335/30/18 Rival tires). There is nearly 2" of suspension bump before it touches (i.e. not compressing) the OEM style bump stops on the frame rails, with trimming you can get far more. Note also how wide the shock mounts are, and the near vertical mounting. This has a significant impact on the springs/shocks to help manage body roll, many of the competing systems mount the shocks quite a bit further inboard - which has a far less positive impact on that attribute. Also give us even more room for huge tailpipes. The rear sway bar is actually a DSE unit borrowed from a friend, it's just mocked up so folks can see the mounting on our system. Might even use it for some initial tuning? Main point here is that you can probably run the exact same rear bar you already have on the car with our system to get started.

      At this ride height/tire choice, the Rear Roll Center Height is about 7 3/4". You have the option of going a bit lower, and of course ride height has a direct impact on this as well. And it is hugely adjustable.

      We haven't been posting here as much as we had previously - focus has been on new product development - but we try to make periodic updates on (anti-) social media, FB and IG. If you like what you see here, check out our pages there too for more info.
      Attached Images Attached Images      
      Mark Magers

      Founder and Principal, Lateral Dynamics LLC
      [email protected]
      lateral-dynamics.com

      One tenth of a second on the race track is often the difference between first place, and fourth.

    5. #45
      Join Date
      Aug 2004
      Location
      Austin, Tx
      Posts
      488
      Country Flag: United States
      Mark,

      What is the clearance between the Watt's mount and the ground at this ride height? Maybe it's the angle of the photo, but that looks pretty low! And if the center pivot of the Watt's is 7 3/4" from the ground, it must be actually low!

      Also, what length shock will work in this arrangement at that ride height? The bars you are using don't look very long either...

      Thanx! Keep at it!
      Bryan (a.k.a. Carbuff)

      70 Camaro RS Hunk'o'Metal - Previous Project
      71 Firebird Project T.O.W. - New Project

    6. #46
      Join Date
      May 2018
      Location
      San Diego County
      Posts
      64
      Country Flag: United States
      Hi Brian, thanks for the questions (and I think I owe you a long overdue e-mail response - sorry!).

      Indeed the lowest part of the cradle is low, it's right at about 5" at this ride height. I think the unit on Bad Penny is actually lower, she had aftermarket frame rails so that affected things way back when, there's never been an issue. Typically, the lowest part on today's hobby cars is going to be the exhaust, or the front splitter (as you are well aware). 5" is a pretty "conservative" clearance for underbody components (which, is exactly the same vertical distance on the new front subframe forward-most point, at a front rocker height of 7", and not by coincidence), you'd hit a lot of other stuff before the cradle. Also, the cradle is very close to the wheels, so there's that benefit as well. I've see a lot of systems that have less clearance than ours.....

      At this ride height, the installed length of the shock is 12.5". This too is not by coincidence, with so many shock suppliers out there, and so many length options, getting a correct length shock is no issue. Typical travel is about 4.5" but this is dependent, again, on ride height.

      DUDE!!!! Short links?!?!?! Why I outta..... Kidding aside, they are actually quite long, we don't sacrifice there. Lowers are over 23" long, upper is only fractionally shorter. You can see exactly how long they are on your next build!
      Mark Magers

      Founder and Principal, Lateral Dynamics LLC
      [email protected]
      lateral-dynamics.com

      One tenth of a second on the race track is often the difference between first place, and fourth.

    7. #47
      Join Date
      Aug 2004
      Location
      Austin, Tx
      Posts
      488
      Country Flag: United States
      Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
      Indeed the lowest part of the cradle is low, it's right at about 5" at this ride height.
      Gotcha. If I recall correctly, my subframe crossmember was around 4 - 4.5" depending on the ride height I had the car set at. It just looked lower in the picture.

      Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
      DUDE!!!! Short links?!?!?! Why I outta..... Kidding aside, they are actually quite long, we don't sacrifice there. Lowers are over 23" long, upper is only fractionally shorter. You can see exactly how long they are on your next build!
      Ha! I meant the rods you have in place of the shocks, not the lower links. ;) I was just trying to figure out how long your shocks would be, and those square bars looked kinda short. ;) It's 12.5" short for a shock? I'm not certain how the length is measured. Perhaps at full extension it would be more like 15" and that is how the manufacturers list length...

      Keep the updates coming.
      Bryan (a.k.a. Carbuff)

      70 Camaro RS Hunk'o'Metal - Previous Project
      71 Firebird Project T.O.W. - New Project

    8. #48
      Join Date
      May 2018
      Location
      San Diego County
      Posts
      64
      Country Flag: United States
      For the shocks, yeah, it's a bit confusing for sure. Typically the noted measurement is the total travel of the shock, then you look at the compressed and extended dimensions "after" that. Not too many years ago, you had a choice of 3", 5" 7" travel shocks for most of the coil over type units. Now, they are putting a lot more in between those, and the higher end shocks you can pretty much spec the travel/lengths you want.

      For this particular setup, the ride height of the sticks is 12.5". This is in the order of a 4.5" travel shock, which is plenty for this application.

      Another important aspect is the installation angle. The more you tip the shock over, the less effective wheel travel you get - it goes as the "cosine" of the angle. Not a big deal below ~30 degrees, but gets ugly fast after that. Also, in compression the angle will increase as the wheel goes into bump, meaning even less effectiveness, and because the spring is in play too, the actual wheel - spring rate drops. No bueno.

      So (at least for us), the order of priority is: 1. Get the lower shock mount out as far as practical on the axle side - this has a direct impact on controlling roll resistance which takes much of the work out of the sway bar. 2. Get the top of the shock as far outboard as practical - see above. 3. Make sure you have at least 2" of bump travel, and work to get an equal amount of droop if possible. If you can't get all three, rinse and repeat the design. All of this is performance oriented approach, if you have a cushy application that needs a lot of soft travel, this still applies but isn't as important.

      Mark Magers

      Founder and Principal, Lateral Dynamics LLC
      [email protected]
      lateral-dynamics.com

      One tenth of a second on the race track is often the difference between first place, and fourth.


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