Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    2

    Which Miller welder....

    So Iím actually an upholstery shop and Iím gonna try my hand at some frame work and building a 4 link for my 1951 Buick. So my little old Lincoln 140 that I use for seat frames is not gonna cut it. Time for an upgrade! So Iím trying to decide between a miller 211 and a 252. Or maybe something in between. I definitely want a Miller though. I donít want overkill though. For basic suspension and frame fabrication I canít imagine I would need to weld anything thicker than 3/8. Which the 211 will do easily in a single pass according to Miller. Iím also not a great welder, but hope to get better. So help me make up my mind please guys and gals! Thank you🤘🤘🤘

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Springs, Texas
    Posts
    3,235
    Country Flag: United States
    I have a Miller 211. Love it, does everything I need it to do.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    kitchener,Ontario,Canada
    Posts
    1,985
    Country Flag: Canada
    Switching sides but consider the lincoln 210 mp
    Spinnin'my tires in life's fast lane

    Ryan Austin
    On twitter @raustinss
    On Instagram austinss70

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dallas, tx
    Posts
    1,598
    Country Flag: United States
    I love my Miller 141. Exact welder that my buddy uses to build cars as well. My neighbor has a Lincoln and the welds are not as nice as my welder. He ended up selling it and buying my Miller 141. Only reason I sold it is because I’m going to buy a multimatic 220

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Murrieta, Ca
    Posts
    783
    Country Flag: United States
    Buy what is in your budget, buy used, and don't get suckered into some fancy unit. Buy only what you know you can handle and then work up from there, ESPECIALLY if you are just getting out of the gate. There is a lot to learn with welding and a lot of people that buy brand new, fancy, shiny machines wind up selling them because they never put the time in behind a hood to develop their skills. They eventually get frustrated and it gets put in the corner and seldom looked at, or the operator NEVER gets close to the machines capabilities. Not sure why you would be so caught up as to demand only a miller, there are plenty of machines out there that are just as good, ESAB, Lincoln, Hobart, etc. Do not buy the hype that one brand is better than the other, don't buy into the notion that one welds better than the other, at this level "starting out" you will hardly ever be in a situation in which you would really notice a difference. There may be some features that are more suitable for you and your application (i.e. infinite voltage control instead of taps) but don't go broke trying to find a perfect machine when you are not sure you can out perform what you have available.

    Second to that, the idea of doing "suspension" work should be the farthest thing from your mind right now, learn how to put down a good weld before you start to concentrate on the complicated aspects that go into suspension fabrication. It is a good way to get yourself killed hurt, or hurt/ kill someone else. Anyway just my .02, I am sure there will be plenty on here that will tell you otherwise. Plenty of die hard Blue/Red box fans around.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    2
    No need to be condescending there shep. Who are you to tell what should be on my mind? I’m quite knowledgeable of the “suspension” work I plan on doing. I also did not say I was a horrible welder but I’m not great. My welds will be up to par if and when I put them on a customers car or my own even for that matter. But obviously I know I need strong welds for chassis and suspension work Captain Obvious. Also my father was a welder and loved millers. Which is why a want a Miller....not that that’s any concern of yours. If you weren’t going to help me decide between millers welders likes the title said....why did you even respond?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    corona,ca.
    Posts
    843
    Country Flag: United States
    " I also did not say I was a horrible welder but I’m not great."
    This statement you wrote,in my opinion...
    YOU SHOULD NOT BE MAKING SUSPENSION PART,when youhave not mastered good welding skills.

    Dont take this in a negative way,but to practice and obtain the skill to be able to make parts for yourself or others.
    72 chevelle.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    IL/TN
    Posts
    782
    Country Flag: United States
    sad to see how newbees respond on message boards the same way as they would on FakeBook, instantly attack after asking a question that answered itself.

    https://www.pro-touringf-body.com "doing what they say can't be done"