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  1. #1
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    Can't crush the crush sleeve

    I'm trying to put this 12 bolt together and I just can't get the pinion and yoke to take up enough slack to start crushing the crush sleeve.

    I'm sure I've screwed up somewhere.

    Rear end is a 12 bolt. Gears are new Richmond 69-0304-1, 4.10s; new yoke is a Strange u1602.

    I've got the bearing pressed onto the pinion. Got the pinion in the housing, crush sleeve in place, front bearing and seal in place.

    I go to torque down the nut and it just stops with about .040 of play fore-aft. Tried a different wrench, and a different wrench (maybe they don't have enough torque!). Even went and bought a wrench that claims 750 lb-ft. Still no dice, it doesn't go any further.



    It almost seems like I'm running out of thread. Pinion washer is about .240.

    Where have I gone wrong? What do I need to measure?


  2. #2
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    Most average impacts won't crush the crush sleeve, I consider a 750ft-lb unit to be pretty average. Even if you find one that will, you really need an experienced hand to not overshoot the crush and force you to start over.

    You need more torque, I have a 3/4" ratchet with a 7' pipe for crush sleeves...
    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
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  3. #3
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    It doesn't seem like I'm getting to the crushing stage with the amount of play I have though?

    If properly assembled, the yoke itself pushes on the front bearing (asking, not stating) but I wouldn't expect to have any fore-aft play at that point; before that contact happens I'd not expect the tightening to just stop.

  4. #4
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    It’s hard to say without looking at it. It’s not exactly easy to crush the collar. How much thread is exposed past the nut?
    1970 Camaro/DSE build


    Are you driver enough? Maybe....come on blue!
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...71#post1147371

  5. #5
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    Only about two threads.

  6. #6
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    Using an impact to crush the crush sleeve is not ideal. The amount of force required to initially make the sleeve collapse is way higher than crushing to set preload. Go too far and your replacing and starting over.
    I use a pinion yoke holder that is 3 feet long. This length helps to lock it against a leaf spring, frame, or stand if building out of the car.
    I use a 3/4" breaker bar with a floor jack handle as my cheater bar, so yes, it takes some oomph to get it to start crushing.
    This is how I do it, I pull it 1/8 turn, and check the pinion for slack, in and out. When I have taken up all the slack, I then pull it it an 1/8 and spin it by hand. It may feel like a little drag at first, but spin it a few times and it loosens up. I keep going until I get 25-30 in. lbs. of rotating torque. You have to spin it by hand several times before getting an accurate rotating torque.
    Craig Scholl
    CJD Automotive, LLC
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    www.cjdautomotive.com

    "I own a Mopar, I already know it won't be in stock, won't ship tomorrow, and won't fit without modification."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoodysGotaCuda View Post
    You need more torque, I have a 3/4" ratchet with a 7' pipe for crush sleeves...
    On the ones that I've done, something like this has been needed. Those crush sleeves take an amazing amount of force to get them to start crushing. Just go slow with it so you don't go too far.


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  8. #8
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    Am I wrong in thinking that he's saying he never gets to the point to crush the sleeve? I may have read it wrong. If I did read wrong, yep to what everyone has said above. Your gonna have to put the "He man" on it for sure.

    Carl Wilson
    1968 Camaro - T-56 6 speed - 383 Stroker, 2014 Mustang GT seats

  9. #9
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    Thanks y'all.

    Carl had it right - it wasn't taking up the slack to get to the crushing of the crush sleeve point.

    As generally suggested, I returned the 750lb-ft impact and got the big 1000lb-ft one instead. I also cleaned up the threads with a wire bruch - which I don't think had anything to do with the issue - and was able to get it done.

    Thanks again for the help.

  10. #10
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    nice!
    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

  11. #11
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    I'd contacted Strange Engineering and Richmond Gear when I was having the issue, and got a response from Strange that's probably useful.

    They said "Our set up guy suggest checking the yoke splines, they can be tight on the gear. If your old yoke slides on the gear easily you should use an emery cloth on the splines of our yoke to help it slid on the gear. We do have to do that sometimes here with our builds, he also said to remove the spacer and try to reinstall the yoke to see if you can install it easier." which is probably really good advice, so I'm sharing it for anyone else who runs into this.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekf View Post
    I'd contacted Strange Engineering and Richmond Gear when I was having the issue, and got a response from Strange that's probably useful.

    They said "Our set up guy suggest checking the yoke splines, they can be tight on the gear. If your old yoke slides on the gear easily you should use an emery cloth on the splines of our yoke to help it slid on the gear. We do have to do that sometimes here with our builds, he also said to remove the spacer and try to reinstall the yoke to see if you can install it easier." which is probably really good advice, so I'm sharing it for anyone else who runs into this.
    I don't know, seems like some poor quality control if the yoke doesn't slip on the splines. I get that maybe its not exactly smooth and require a little pressure to slip it on, but surely a nut being driven down on it with hundreds of FTLBS or torque and it doesn't move?!?!?...Hmm....
    1970 Camaro/DSE build


    Are you driver enough? Maybe....come on blue!
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...71#post1147371

  13. #13
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    What dont you use a solid pinion spacer with shims?
    There easier to set up
    72 chevelle.