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  1. #1
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    Knurling on axles for wheel studs - broached or from installing studs?

    I recently received a 9" Currie rear end. Was installing brakes, and the rotors didn't fit. Noticed that one of the studs was not seated, and was a bit cocked. So, I knocked it back out, the knurling on the stud was pretty dinged up, but I went ahead and tried to re-install it. Got it lined up with where it was and rather than drive it in from the back, I put a nut on it to try to pull it in from the front. It spun. Knurling was bad before, now it is gone. THis is the stud.

    Anyway, so I remove it, and take a look at the axle. I notice there is no knurling at all on that stud hole. Is that normal? Meaning, does the process rely on the stud to deform the hole in the axle flange when it is installed, or is there a part of teh machining process that cuts knurls into the axle flange? These are some sort of worked metal I believe, not cast, so I imagine the metal is very hard.

    Unfortunately, this thing has become a big headache. Took them 8 months to get it to me, they did not install the adjustable LCA brackets, the packaging was crap and it got banged up shipping, etc. This is all to say that I am hoping I can just get another stud and run it in, rather than pull the &*^(ing axle and have to deal with things, yet again. But I'm just skeptical that I can, I'm wondering if it is a manufacturing problem.
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  2. #2
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    The hole in the flange needs to be smaller than the knurling on the stud. The knurling deforms the flange hole.

    As an example a 1/2" ARP wheel stud with a knurling section that is 0.680" requires a 43/64 drill bit to create a hole which is 0.671875".

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOT A TA View Post
    The knurling deforms the flange hole. .
    This is what I was asking, thank you.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 67King View Post
    This is what I was asking, thank you.
    There is no knurl in the axle flange hole. The knurl is on the stud. The knurl is supposed to deform and conform to the hole for a press fit. If the knurl deformed the hole, you could never re-install a new stud. That’s not the case from what I have seen. The best way to install studs is a stud tool. Make the job easy and the studs go in straight. $35 at a parts store, $20 on-line.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by badazz81z28 View Post
    There is no knurl in the axle flange hole. The knurl is on the stud. The knurl is supposed to deform and conform to the hole for a press fit. If the knurl deformed the hole, you could never re-install a new stud. Thatís not the case from what I have seen. The best way to install studs is a stud tool. Make the job easy and the studs go in straight. $35 at a parts store, $20 on-line.
    That is actually what I did. Hardened steel collar around the stud to pull it in place, and it spun. Same concept, if not sold that way. Just spun before it ever seated.

    I've never seen knurls deform like this. Whether steel or aluminum, they've always left fit into matching set on the female part. And I've never seen the knurling not still mostly in tact. I just have never installed studs into a "virgin" component, so the "negative" of the knurls has always been in place. So I've never known if the knurling deformed the female part, or if in some cases, they were cut to accept knurling. Real common problem with GM front control arms is that people who don't know use a tool on the outside of the control arm bolt, not knowing it is a knurled stud, and when they turn it, they damage teh frame.

    Anyway, I have a new stud on the way, hope I don't have the same problem. Should have probably ordered a couple.
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  6. #6
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    For comparison, here is a shot of the knurling on one of the studs I pulled out of the race car (Porsche) to install longer, bullet nose studs.
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  7. #7
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    Not the same as hardened washers and grease. This tool
    Is great

    https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-22800-W.../dp/B000ETUD22


    The knurl looks that way because the stud spun in the hole. If a stud doesn’t go in, the hole was too small for the knurl size
    1970 Camaro/DSE build


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by badazz81z28 View Post
    Not the same as hardened washers and grease. This tool
    Is great

    https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-22800-W.../dp/B000ETUD22


    The knurl looks that way because the stud spun in the hole. If a stud doesn’t go in, the hole was too small for the knurl size
    It wasn't a washer, it was a half inch thick hardened spacer. Forget where I got it, but I bought some when fitting wheels, to try before I have spacers made. It fit the stud quite closely, as it was made for a half inch shaft. And I used a flat nut, not a lug nut, so the cone pocket wasn't a factor.

    I am guessing that when the stud was installed by Currie, at a slight angle, it damaged the threads, and I just finished off them. They must just press them in from the back, without a proper alignment tool. Surprised the axle flange shows no signs that anything knurled was there.

    Anyway, I do appreciate the feedback. Different than what I"m used to seeing.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by badazz81z28 View Post
    There is no knurl in the axle flange hole. The knurl is on the stud. The knurl is supposed to deform and conform to the hole for a press fit. If the knurl deformed the hole, you could never re-install a new stud. Thatís not the case from what I have seen. The best way to install studs is a stud tool. Make the job easy and the studs go in straight. $35 at a parts store, $20 on-line.
    The stud is made of harder steel than the axle flange. The knurling on the stud DOES NOT deform when installed properly. When replacing a stud you line up the knurling on the new stud with the grooves left by the old stud in the axle flange.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOT A TA View Post
    The stud is made of harder steel than the axle flange. The knurling on the stud DOES NOT deform when installed properly. When replacing a stud you line up the knurling on the new stud with the grooves left by the old stud in the axle flange.

    Its a press fit. The knurl on the old stud is stripped.
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  11. #11
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    Take the old stud to your local auto parts store and have them match it. Dorman has an entire catalog of just different size studs. Or better yet find an ARP stud set and replace them all. This is not rocket science it is a press fit stud. In the time you have spent taking and posting pics you could have been to the parts store and back with a new stud.

    BTW, This is the stud puller I have which includes a thrust bearing.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJDMan View Post
    Take the old stud to your local auto parts store and have them match it. Dorman has an entire catalog of just different size studs. Or better yet find an ARP stud set and replace them all. This is not rocket science it is a press fit stud. In the time you have spent taking and posting pics you could have been to the parts store and back with a new stud.

    BTW, This is the stud puller I have which includes a thrust bearing.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Only one in town that has a collection of Studs is Pep Boys, and they just closed all of their parts departments. Anyway, I got a new stud, the above recommended stud puller.............
    .......................and still managed to have issues. So apparently an impact is not a good idea, even though they advertise using one. Guess the threads got too hot and it seized. Still didn't quite manage to seat all of the way, either. So I couldn't get teh lug nut off. Eventually hit it long enough with an impact that it fatigued and failed. Interesting, because it backed off a bit before it seized. But at least teh axle now has started to take the knurling so the next one should go in more easily. So it now looks exactly like I expected, which is exactly like every other one of these I have done before (except every other time, I've "pushed" them in with either a press or a pneumatic hammer, rather than pulled like these).
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  13. #13
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    Using my Lisle tool, I put anti-seize on the threads for lubrication and an open end lug nut to pull it through. The Lisle tool and the lug nut ensures the stud goes in straight and the lubricant prevents galling. I use a 1/2” ratchet so I know it’s smooth and no binding and when to stop! I use a torque wrench with the proper wheel torque to ensure it’s seated. The tool in post #7 is sold at Orielly. I don’t like the one in post 11. You need one that uses the tapered lug nut.


    Is this a corvette stud?? I have OEM studs with the starter nose that I’m not using.
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  14. #14
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    Shocked this thread is still going on. Buy a stud, put anti seize on it, use a impact and pull it in. You just had a string of bad luck. Redo it and your set

  15. #15
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    The Lisle tool has a bearing built in to allow the lugnut to spin, but not the stud. Better way to prevent this is to pull the axle and use a press with the appropriate adapters to press in the stud, eliminate the chance of spinning. Aftermarket axles are made out of harder material than stock and are usually more difficult to install studs, especially if using a high tensile stud like ARP, that also hardened. We had one set on our SN95 where we had to turn .005 off the splines on the ARP studs just to install them and it took a 50 ton press. First time I've ever had to do that. I hate overstressing the threads just to install a stud, kinda defeats the purpose in the first place. An alternative next time is to order axles for threaded studs, or bite the time bullet and send it back under warranty. Good luck!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rixtrix1 View Post
    The Lisle tool has a bearing built in to allow the lugnut to spin, but not the stud. Better way to prevent this is to pull the axle and use a press with the appropriate adapters to press in the stud, eliminate the chance of spinning. Aftermarket axles are made out of harder material than stock and are usually more difficult to install studs, especially if using a high tensile stud like ARP, that also hardened. We had one set on our SN95 where we had to turn .005 off the splines on the ARP studs just to install them and it took a 50 ton press. First time I've ever had to do that. I hate overstressing the threads just to install a stud, kinda defeats the purpose in the first place. An alternative next time is to order axles for threaded studs, or bite the time bullet and send it back under warranty. Good luck!
    That's exactly what people do when they pull them in with an impact and just slide on a bunch of washers. The Lisle tool, I actually used a torque wrench just to see how smooth the tool really is.
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  17. #17
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    I strongly question if the quality (in this case hardness, sizing accuracy, and tensile strength) of the studs you are getting is adequate.

    Aside from my "hobby" experience, I work as a very (we have no shop foreman) hands-on parts manager for a busy new - and used- dealership. For us, selling 120 used vehicles a month is a slow month. We're also in Canada where tires are switched out twice a year, often at home by owners with cold hand and more enthusiasm and testosterone than experience & judgement. We do a fair number of studs.
    If I saw this happening, I'd be questioning the quality control of whatever stud we were using. IMO, there is no way the splines on that stud should have flattened that much.
    FWIW, we use Napa ones, which can be either repacked OEM or repacked Dorman, or contracted special.

    Yes the axles are smooth bore when new. (just as wiper arms are smooth bore when new, FWIW- common question I get from those working on their own cars)