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  1. #1
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    Sep 2016
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    Lithium-ion batteries

    What is the popular brand/PN for the more popular lithium-ion car batteries out there being used in Pro Touring? Are many people running a 16v setup? What sort of 16v specific battery tender are you using?

    This seems to be a growing niche the past several years and I've read of many advantages to having the 16v battery.
    http://www.TheFOAT.com/92GTA
    1969 Pontiac Firebird
    w/BP 461ci stroker kit, 670 heads & XE274H cam. Primer black w/black interior.
    1992 Pontiac Trans Am GTA w/SLP Performance Package. Dark Jade Grey Metallic, grey leather, T-Tops.

  2. #2
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    Sep 2016
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    Bump.
    http://www.TheFOAT.com/92GTA
    1969 Pontiac Firebird
    w/BP 461ci stroker kit, 670 heads & XE274H cam. Primer black w/black interior.
    1992 Pontiac Trans Am GTA w/SLP Performance Package. Dark Jade Grey Metallic, grey leather, T-Tops.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Bakersfield, CA
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    So I have it narrowed down to these 3 batteries, the first one is 16v and the other 2 are 12v:

    https://www.golithium.com/product-pa...harger-package

    https://shop.sparkedinnovations.com/...52ah-group-34/

    2v-battery-and-charger-package" target="_blank">https://www.golithium.com/product-pa...harger-package


    I'm leaning towards the XS Power 12v, the specs are just amazing. XS Power has a 16v, but the specs are far less impressive compared to their 12v: https://shop.sparkedinnovations.com/...-4ah-group-34/

    Thoughts?



    EDIT: Here is another 12v option: https://antigravitybatteries.com/pro...tive/ag-35-rs/

    I think all in all, I will go with the XS Power 12v. Then I have zero risk to any components which may be too sensitive for the 16v battery.
    http://www.TheFOAT.com/92GTA
    1969 Pontiac Firebird
    w/BP 461ci stroker kit, 670 heads & XE274H cam. Primer black w/black interior.
    1992 Pontiac Trans Am GTA w/SLP Performance Package. Dark Jade Grey Metallic, grey leather, T-Tops.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    way east on a rock
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    I thought my AGM was expensive! I don't see a weight on the Li- Io batt?

  5. #5
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    Sep 2016
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    Between 8-16 lbs for most. I'm buying them more for the voltage consistancy than the weight savings since it's in my trunk anyway.
    http://www.TheFOAT.com/92GTA
    1969 Pontiac Firebird
    w/BP 461ci stroker kit, 670 heads & XE274H cam. Primer black w/black interior.
    1992 Pontiac Trans Am GTA w/SLP Performance Package. Dark Jade Grey Metallic, grey leather, T-Tops.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    N. Scottsdale
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    I too am battery shopping, and am considering lithium-ion. I wouldn't mind spending the money for one given the weight and specs on paper, but wondering if there are any special considerations for the charging system/alternator and other electronics?

  7. #7
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    Jun 2013
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    Central FL
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    I've used lithium ion for years in hobby remote control. You cant just charge them with normal lead acid charger. They need a constant current supply until the voltage gets close to max and then they switch to constant voltage and slowly taper off the current. Overcharging them turns them into fireballs.

    That being said a couple articles I've read say they have battery management built in for car applications. The one company claims 35-60 pounds weight savings but I think a typical battery we would use in a PT car are only 35 pounds. Then you are talking 20 pound weight savings.

    Personally I don't think they have enough advantages to swap over for my car when you consider the price difference. If it's a Max effort race build then 20 pounds is significant, in a street car not so much.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    I have a customer who's been running a Li-ion battery since 2014. Same battery, no problems, works great. He uses the supplied charger for battery maintenance when he parks the car at home.

    I used a Li-ion battery in my C6 Z06 for years as well. Same thing: I kept it on the provided battery maintenance charger when the car was parked. I sold the car in 2016, and the new owner is still using that original battery afaik.
    John Parsons



    II Much Fabrication's Blog -- New products, Fabrication sequences, etc.

    II Much Fabrication's Current Build -- LS9-powered 69 Camaro

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Portsmouth NH
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    I only have some experience using them in motorcycles for the last decade. They have definitely improved them over the years and having a good charger is essential. That said I have been using them in my street bikes and race bikes with good results. My newest batteries have lasted 5 & 6 years and are still running strong. They are able to crank over a high compression (13:1) race twin and a 10:1 street 900 street twin with no problem from remarkably small and light weight batteries.

    My only complaint is they are sensitive to cold. They definitely lose alot of cranking power when they get cold. The trick I have found is to turn on a head light (street bike) and draw current to warm them up a bit. This usually warms the bat up and then it will turn over.

    Personally I would consider one for my car. Maybe once my current battery dies I will replace it with one.
    1969 Camaro

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    N. Scottsdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92foxgt View Post
    ...They need a constant current supply until the voltage gets close to max and then they switch to constant voltage and slowly taper off the current. Overcharging them turns them into fireballs.

    That being said a couple articles I've read say they have battery management built in for car applications. The one company claims 35-60 pounds weight savings but I think a typical battery we would use in a PT car are only 35 pounds. Then you are talking 20 pound weight savings....

    Their size and weight open up options for placement.

    My question is whether one can just replace the tried and true AGM battery used in our cars with a Lithium-ION one without having to change anything else in the car's electrical system--e.g., will a conventional alternator keep it charged?