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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    57

    AAW and GMPP Starter wiring question

    Running an AAW update kit along with a GMPP connect and cruise setup. I donít want to run two separate power wires from the battery to the other side of the car for the GMPP fuse panel and the starter. My thought is to run from the positive battery post to the GMPP power in stud and then from the power in stud to the starter like pictured below. Does anyone see a problem with this idea, should I just run two separate wires and just be done with it? I do plan on putting a fused power distribution block near the positive battery post that is not pictured.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wylie, Texas
    Posts
    163
    Country Flag: United States
    Don't do it, the starter can draw up to 150 amps while cranking so even a very small resistance at that fuse panel bolt can cause a big voltage at that point and wreak havoc on the electrical system.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dallas, tx
    Posts
    1,560
    Country Flag: United States
    My battery is in the trunk

    I ran the battery wires up to the firewall, used two bulk heads and ran all of my power wires off of it. Alternator to lug, and starter to lug on the engine side. Cabin side I have the battery wire, aaw power wire, and gmpp fuse panel power

    Works like a champ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    98
    Here's a couple of options-

    1)Run wire to starter then to GMPP Fuses- option to run the bulkhead off the GMPP fuse post instead of the starter

    2) Use a buss bar- some really good marine stuff out there- stay away from the car stereo junk

    Post fuses-I like the Blue Sea marine stuff at the battery- 200 A seems to work fine on most cars for the starter.

    For the alternator choose the fuse to match the size of the wire- so 6 gauge wire I wouldn't fuse more than 125. You want to protect the wire from burning before the fuse pops-

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    57
    Thanks for the advice looks like a distribution block it is. I was looking at the marine blocks that hold ANL fuses so I could fuse each circuit individually and it looks like that’s the way to go.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarson25 View Post
    Thanks for the advice looks like a distribution block it is. I was looking at the marine blocks that hold ANL fuses so I could fuse each circuit individually and it looks like that’s the way to go.
    My thoughts are-

    Fusing at the battery protects big problems...so the wire is completely protected FROM the battery. If the alternator wire is dead shorted - it'll stop working- but the battery won't- it will continue for quite some time.

    Here's a test- touch the output of an alternator to a ground- just a little smoke out of the alternator. Touch the battery wire to a ground- ant then tell me what happens. DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!!!

    Fusing down stream only makes sense when you drop the wire size down. So unless you are putting the buss bar at the battery- it's not the best choice- as the wire from the battery is not protected or if you have both fused it's redundant - not really needed


    The small wires off the buss bar need to be rated for the size of wire- 12 Gauge wire- 20 A for 14 Gauge 15 A and 16 Gauge 10 A

    Richard

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    57
    That’s my plan, I want to run the fuses block about 6” from the battery. Run the battery cable to the block and fuse each big circuit there. Should be pretty basic just need to build yet another bracket to hold the fuse block.