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  1. #1
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    Very Basic Paint Question

    I have a 67 Camaro that has most of its original paint. Is it truly necessary to strip the car prior to a repaint. The original paint is not nice enough to use as is, but if it is not necessary to strip the complete car I would prefer not to at this point. There is no rust repair needed, just a repaint.

    Ray S.


  2. #2
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    Drive it as a patina car until you can afford to do a proper repaint.
    Tracey

  3. #3
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    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaints1115 View Post
    Drive it as a patina car until you can afford to do a proper repaint.
    While I do appreciate your opinion, I would still like to know if it would need to be completely striped or if it would not cause issues. It's not a cost question on my end.
    Ray S.

  4. #4
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    Not an expert but if it's the "original" paint I've had good luck scuffing the original paint and using an epoxy primer. Just make sure you have a single layer of paint that has not started to flake or is be weather checked.

  5. #5
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    If you have good adhesion on the original paint, you can scuff and shoot it. If that's what you wanted to do.
    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

  6. #6
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    Original paint was acrylic lacquer. I wouldn’t risk it.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  7. #7
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    Then yes, if a quality finished paint job is desired, your best plan of attack is to start with bare metal and use quality products from scratch. The final product is only as good as it's foundation.
    Tracey

  8. #8
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    On a later model car,scuffing & going over original paint is usually just fine, But not on over 50 year old paint. Then on the most of the original paint deal, you never know what's there. Most older cars got some damage first few years of ownership.
    Now for stripping, especially old lacquer, a decent grinder & rust removal discs can get it done in a day without high costs or even bringing the car somewhere. Then follow up with a light 80 grit da sanding & epoxy.

  9. #9
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    Absolutely no need to strip your car. if there are no adhesion problems, sand, epoxy prime, then shoot. Even the best don't strip the car unless it's necessary (Bitchin' Rides) for example.

  10. #10
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    Thanks to everyone that has replied.

    I'm not a painter, but I have been told over the years both opinions of it must be striped completely and if the paint isn't coming off it's fine to prime over and paint. I know it is always best to start fresh, I was just curious what the general thought process was from a group of people that build and paint cars with today's technology. It's actually kinda funny the opinion is still somewhat split. The main issue in my mind is to completely strip the car, it would need to be dipped or blasted, including the jambs and all the other cracks and crevasses that hand sanding is tough in. These are the areas that were of more concern to me than the main body.
    Ray S.

  11. #11
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    Aug 2007
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    It's a pain to strip a car.

    Here's what I've done.

    Start with the fenders, doors, hood or trunk lid. You can use a DA or chemical stripper on the big areas. Keep the chemical stripper away from seams or edges. I like chemical stripper although it's very stinky and caustic.Then if you have a air compressor buy or borrow a small (40lb) pressure sand blaster and do all edges. Or before a I had a air compressor I took the parts to a local sand blaster to do the edges. Then bring the parts down to a local body shop 10 minutes after they are done sand blasting and have then spray them with epoxy primer to prevent flash rust. Do one piece at a time as you have time. The body is about the same but more time sand blasting the edges.

  12. #12
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    My first step is to try a razor blade scraper. On some cars the paint comes off easily and makes much less mess. Chemical stripper is a last resort for me. It’s nasty stuff.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  13. #13
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    What kind of paint job were you planning? A nice quality repaint or something show worthy? Paints not cheap when you do it right and I look at investing that money and being sure that nothing will ruin it from an existing layer on the surface.
    Tracey

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhutton View Post
    Original paint was acrylic lacquer. I wouldn’t risk it.

    Don
    What I'm sayin'. Not because we think you should do extra work just for the fun of it, but I personally just wouldn't risk it. You don't know what has leeched into the paint (if anything), or any number of other problems that could pop up. On the other hand if a mediocre paint job is ok and your not the least bit worried something could go wrong then scuff and paint away.. Good luck with what ever you decide to do.

    Carl Wilson
    1968 Camaro - T-56 6 speed - 383 Stroker, 2014 Mustang GT seats

  15. #15
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    I'm no expert body man but the results from a stripped car and fresh paint to just a "paint over" job is night and day.
    Last edited by DT69Cam; 07-31-2019 at 04:59 AM. Reason: type-o