Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    Country Flag: United States

    Lead filler replacement

    I replaced a quarter panel and the tail light panel on my '72 Nova, now I'm onto bodywork but I don't want to try and learn how to work with lead, I've heard there are fillers out there now that supposedly work as well as lead. Is this true? What are you guys using to fill these voids? I could mig weld fill the void but it seems like there has to be a better way.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    charlotte
    Posts
    601
    Country Flag: United States
    I'm no body man but I did similar research 6 months ago. I ended up going with evercoat metal-2-metal which is an aluminum reinforced filler. Seems there's no straight answer to your question but the only uniform advice I got is to stick with the one brand from start to finish. since I was using evercoat it made the decision a little easier.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Springs, Texas
    Posts
    3,051
    Country Flag: United States
    I use SEM Carbofil. Carbon fiber reinforced filler.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26
    Country Flag: United States
    Both of those options sound great, I talked to a 3M rep and they had also suggested using body panel adhesive topped with fiberglass filler.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Springs, Texas
    Posts
    3,051
    Country Flag: United States
    Quote Originally Posted by k72nova View Post
    Both of those options sound great, I talked to a 3M rep and they had also suggested using body panel adhesive topped with fiberglass filler.
    Not sure what the panel adhesive adds to the joint aside from selling some expensive product. I use it but see zero value in using it in that application unless you are somehow getting it into the pinch weld joint.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Jonesboro, Arkansas
    Posts
    2,307
    Country Flag: United States
    Quote Originally Posted by dhutton View Post
    Not sure what the panel adhesive adds to the joint aside from selling some expensive product. I use it but see zero value in using it in that application unless you are somehow getting it into the pinch weld joint.

    Don
    I agree, it's a adhesive, not a filler. Mostly used where welding on a panel was either too hard to get to or a time saving measure. It does quite well for what it's designed to be used for.

    Carl Wilson
    1968 Camaro - T-56 6 speed - 383 Stroker, 2014 Mustang GT seats

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    jacksonville,fl
    Posts
    916
    Country Flag: United States
    Expansion & contraction factor with 8115 is a lot. I have used it to extend an edge in the past, but I wouldn't use it where I'm trying to eliminate ghosting.
    Researched the carbosill for my own info yesterday. It's been out at least 10 years now, though I hadn't heard of it yet. I'd imagine it's probably similar to a Kevlar reinforced filler by evercoat that I have used personally over 10 years ago.
    As far as fillers for this application, vette panel adhesive , all metal, or a duraglass type product do all work, but the carbosill could be the best choice. A little more expensive, but when talking about a joint that's pretty close to eye level, it ain't worth skimping. By theoretical thinking , the carbon fiber strands will help to bridge any expansion /contraction better than the other mentioned products.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Mid-Michigan
    Posts
    2,724
    Country Flag: United States
    Like everyone is alluding to... Do NOT use the panel glue OR fiberglass. To much differential in shrinking and expanding and the joint will always be visible. I use Aluma-Lead which is about the same thing as Metal 2 Metal. It is a 2 part epoxy carrier with an aluminum based filler. I have never had an issue with shrinkage with the this product.
    Mark
    Mark:
    "Bad Ast" Astro Van. Just because I did it... Doesn't mean it's possible...
    This my Bad Ast thread...
    https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...roject-Faze-II
    This is my Fotki album...
    http://astroracer.fotki.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    260
    I'm no body work expert but why not use 18-16 gauge sheet metal to very carefully cut to fit and then mig or tig weld in? Then metal finish as needed and then minimal filler? Or East wood makes lead like filler instead of real lead. Just my .02.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Kingman AZ
    Posts
    38
    Country Flag: United States
    In our body shop we use All- Metal filler in place of lead. It doesn’t shrink up and dries extremely hard.
    It can be worked with a bondo grinder after drying but needs to be semi finished before it sets. It is permanent and the only way to remove it is with a torch.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    jacksonville,fl
    Posts
    916
    Country Flag: United States
    Quote Originally Posted by 79 Camaro View Post
    I'm no body work expert but why not use 18-16 gauge sheet metal to very carefully cut to fit and then mig or tig weld in? Then metal finish as needed and then minimal filler? Or East wood makes lead like filler instead of real lead. Just my .02.
    Thicker metal welded into a joint as a filler can shadow just as well. Cutting & butt joints are best for sheet metal, but in some areas this can be more work & more potential spread out warpage than it's worth vs filling in a seam properly.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Jonesboro, Arkansas
    Posts
    2,307
    Country Flag: United States
    Just learn the lead system It took me a while to get it down, but I used it on my door edges after I welded 1/8 " filler rod on.

    Carl Wilson
    1968 Camaro - T-56 6 speed - 383 Stroker, 2014 Mustang GT seats

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Posts
    62
    Country Flag: United States
    The reason lead was used is because it was semi-flexible. The joint at the quarter to roof was spot welded at the factory and allows flex. If you seam weld and make it rigid you can use Dura-glas filler then top coat with a standard filler as a finish coat before primer.
    Joshua O

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Springs, Texas
    Posts
    3,051
    Country Flag: United States
    Carbofill is flexible, that’s why I use it.

    Never drank the all metal/metal to metal koolaid. It’s seems like it’s just normal talc based filler with aluminum powder in it. I don’t see any cross linking with powder. I want some kind of strong strands in the filler.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1957 Buick Caballero - huge project
    1959 El Camino - Ironworks frame
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anniston, Al
    Posts
    281
    Country Flag: United States
    Here's what I did, this way I minimized the filler I needed. Haven't driven the car yet so can't say for sure if there will be any issues but we will see.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    1967 Firebird (current project)
    1967 Firebird (unfinished project SOLD)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Jonesboro, Arkansas
    Posts
    2,307
    Country Flag: United States
    That looks pretty good to me..

    Carl Wilson
    1968 Camaro - T-56 6 speed - 383 Stroker, 2014 Mustang GT seats