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  1. #1
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    Intake Piping - Rattle Can Ceramic/Thermal Barrier?

    Exhaust air from the radiator seems to be heating up my incoming air pretty decently. I'd like to find a ceramic coating of sort [like Lizard Skin Thermal Barrier] but in a rattle can to hit this pipe with.

    Any ideas? I'd like to avoid aluminum/gold pipe insulation

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    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

  2. #2
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    Oh yeah use appliance epoxy
    From a place you will not see comes a sound you will not hear....

    67 Camaro In progress

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  3. #3
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    Actually since it's a pretty simple straight, I think i'll just go for a carbon fiber tube, that should insulate quite well.
    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

  4. #4
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    If it's a single wall pipe it will get just as warm as the "aluminum"? one you have in place now. Changing the material will not keep it from getting hot. If you want to keep the heat off the intake you will have to cover the whole assembly with a custom cover.
    Mark
    Mark:
    "Bad Ast" Astro Van. Just because I did it... Doesn't mean it's possible...
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by astroracer View Post
    If it's a single wall pipe it will get just as warm as the "aluminum"? one you have in place now. Changing the material will not keep it from getting hot. If you want to keep the heat off the intake you will have to cover the whole assembly with a custom cover.
    Mark

    Carbon is about 40x less thermally conductive than aluminum. A small strip of an aluminum barrier in front of it to break the convection heat [first wall] and I won't have a problem worth mentioning.
    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune

  6. #6
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    Less conductive short term, yes but I am looking at long term in a heat soak condition. It will get hot and it will transmit that heat to the intake air charge. If you only drive the car short distances you will probably be fine but any long distance, say an hour or more, and you will see heat transfer. If you can build a shield as a disconnect to the under hood temps the incoming cold air should help keep the whole duct cooler.
    The thing to do is get some real world temps. Use a temp gun to record the tube temps as you drive the car. Check the inlet and outlet temps. If they are really getting that hot then you may have a concern.
    Mark

    P.S. You have a beautiful car there, I hope you drive the snot out of it.
    Mark:
    "Bad Ast" Astro Van. Just because I did it... Doesn't mean it's possible...
    This my Bad Ast thread...
    https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...roject-Faze-II
    This is my Fotki album...
    http://astroracer.fotki.com/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by astroracer View Post
    Less conductive short term, yes but I am looking at long term in a heat soak condition. It will get hot and it will transmit that heat to the intake air charge. If you only drive the car short distances you will probably be fine but any long distance, say an hour or more, and you will see heat transfer. If you can build a shield as a disconnect to the under hood temps the incoming cold air should help keep the whole duct cooler.
    The thing to do is get some real world temps. Use a temp gun to record the tube temps as you drive the car. Check the inlet and outlet temps. If they are really getting that hot then you may have a concern.
    Mark

    P.S. You have a beautiful car there, I hope you drive the snot out of it.

    I do have a cheap thermocouple reader that'll run two thermocouples as I go down the road, I may rig up a test for the heck of it to get the following three values on a drive:

    Air Filter Air Temp [Inlet] - Thermocouple
    Intake Air Temp [Outlet @ Throttle Body] - IAT Sensor
    Tube surface temp - Thermocouple



    Most of the time I don't drive long distances. My commute is only 30mi round trip, which in North Texas, doesn't take very long. I'd like to keep the IATs down where it makes the most sense but not go too crazy over it. What I have now is far better than what I had last week [below].

    At low throttle cruise I can watch the IAT run at higher temps. With >20% throttle, the air doesn't spend enough time in the intake tract to really pickup much heat and IATs drop very quickly as the revs come up.


    ..In the end, the car is in good enough shape that I'm bored and am fiddling with a few degrees on my IAT. I need a Hellcat motor to distract me, and I do drive the wheels off of it!


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    1972 Plymouth 'Cuda - Not LS-swapped, 5.7L Hemi [MS3 Gold Box], T56 Magnum 6-speed - 'Cuda Build Page
    1976 Dodge D100 - Warlock
    2016 Subaru WRX - E30 Tune