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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Springs, Texas
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    2,645
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnUlaszek View Post
    SAE 30 R14 will outgas fuel vapor if its used with compatible fuels, and it will degrade and outgas even more vapor if its not. Generally speaking, anything thats advertised as fuel line but is flexible is going to outgas and degrade to some degree depending on the fuel used. Fuel tank venting is obviously a low pressure application, so its tempting to go the inexpensive route in this area -- this can be problematic if controlling odor is a concern, and it can be dangerous if the vent system is installed inside the vehicle in terms of toxic exposure to gasoline fumes and fire risk. I would not use anything but steel hard lines or PTFE conductive core. Adapting to the nipple/barb is problematic in some cases as the industry really hasn't standardized in this area. Currently I see the gamut of SAE O-Ring Ports, SAE Quick Connect, NPT, various plain steel tubing diameters, all of which require a different method to convert to PTFE or hard line. Flexible rubber type hose is very attractive given this, but should be avoided.

    Hose suppliers are increasingly listing SAE specs, but don't typically explain them. This is a problem as most parts of the US are going to have fuels that have 10% or more of ethanal or other additives and this may increase to 15% with recently announced changes by the president. If you look up the SAE standard you will find hose like Carl pointed to will outgas with 5% additive even though its meets the criteria. The utility of the hose will rapidly degrades at 10% or higher additives -- see below. There is a LOT going on with respect to modern fuels and their effects on vintage cars. I'll be writing about this on the II MUCH Blog.

    "Hose which may be supplied either coupled or uncoupled for use with gasoline, diesel fuel, lubrication oil, or the vapor
    present in either the fuel system or in the crankcase of internal combustion engines in small engine applications. Exposure of these hoses to gasoline or diesel fuel which contain high levels, greater than 5% by volume, of oxygenates, i.e., ethanol, methanol, or MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), may result in significantly higher permeation rates than those listed for 30R14. "

    Attachment 160391
    Holley Vaporgard hose does not outgas in my experience. It has a liner and is a lot more flexible than Teflon hose. Great product imho and has a nice OEM look.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1969 Camaro convertible - LS3 4L65E Ridetech Level 2 Tru-Turn - sold
    1959 El Camino
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Deployed
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    2,590
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    I have been using Earl nylon braded hose for my vent for at least 4 years...never notice gas smell from the car just sitting. My exhaust smell is what's irritating.
    1970 Camaro/DSE build


    Are you driver enough? Maybe....come on blue!
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...71#post1147371

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    606

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    Quote Originally Posted by badazz81z28 View Post
    I have been using Earl nylon braded hose for my vent for at least 4 years...never notice gas smell from the car just sitting. My exhaust smell is what's irritating.
    If you look under the hood of any new vehicle you'll see black hard "plastic" fuel hose; this is PTFE conductive core. The OEM's use this to control evaporative emissions and to ensure the hose isn't degraded by fuel additives. There is tremendous variation in the hoses available labeled as "fuel hose" some which are advertised to meet the requirements of the dozen variations of SAE J30. The requirements in J30 for permeation g/m/day range from "not required" to "none" -- a hose can meet the requirement yet still outgas vapor or be incompatible with available fuel blends. So, what is working for you might not work for someone else and may not continue to work given the continuous changes in fuel formulations and how the products are used. As a car owner this may or may not be an issue for you, but if you are a car builder or manufacturer its a big deal.

    Last edited by JohnUlaszek; 4 Days Ago at 08:07 AM.


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