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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Default Pro touring classic truck

    Hey guys, Iíve been kicking around the idea of trying out the pro touring style truck build or autocross. I was wondering if you guys could give me some ideas on what would be the best truck to get for this style. What I want is basically a stock frame and upgrade the suspension a little bit. I donít want to go all out at all. Just something that handles great and I can take to the track if I decide too. Hopefully you guys can give me some ideas on what you guys would do. I have a 56 Chevy truck but Iím leaving the stock dropped axle and leaf springs in it for now, cuz I want to drive it soon. Thatís a long story in its own. Basically I had a builder that was going to build it and he stole everything from me. So I just want to get the 56 going so I can drive it with my kids. So basically since Iím keeping the leaf springs thatís a no go out there. 49-54 Chevy trucks are axle as well so thatís out. 55-59 can be updated but I donít think I want to go that route again. 60-66 is an option as well as 67-72 because they have a decent suspension and I can upgrade as I go. Any thoughts guys. Sorry about the long post. Thank you guys

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    Being more of a Ford guy this will be hard for me to say, but your best bet is probably a 67-72 C10. There is an absurd amount of aftermarket support for those compared to pretty much any other classic truck when it comes to track or autocross. You can do a lot with them with the stock frame. And the options range from mild to wild carbon body beasts.

    But with some patience and ingenuity, any old truck can be made into something pro touring style and fun. Really depends on how much bolt on vs fabrication you want to do. I'm a glutton for punishment and picked the fabrication everything route.

    - - - Updated - - -

    And don't be stingy with pics of that '56.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2017
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    Truck is super ugly and now in pieces. It was supposed to be built a couple years ago. But my best friends brother took my truck and was supposed to build it. Well long story short he stole both of my motors, aluminum fuel tank, wheels, steering column and some other stuff so now Iím back to square one. Thatís why I want to get it on the road and drive it with my kids. So thatís why Iím keeping the axle since itís already in it
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  4. #4
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    Aug 2011
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    Sevierville, TN
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    Sbeck is right. The 63-72 Chevy platform will be your best bet. I'm running my 68 with the stock chassis upgraded with TCI Engineering front and rear setup and doing pretty well with it on the autocross courses.

    The popularity of these trucks is the factory trailing arm/coil spring rear suspension which is basically the same setup that's been used in NASCAR for many years.
    Matt Kenner

    68 C10 stepside

    If you can leave two black stripes from the exit of one corner to the braking zone of the next, you have enough horsepower. - Mark Donohue

  5. #5
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    Aug 2010
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    now In Dandridge, Tn.
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    Glad you joined the group. I have to say, the 55-9 CPU is my fav. I've had the same 56 since I was 16. (that's a long time) It is true, that the 67-72 CPU (which really means 63-72) have the most support, but there is plenty for the 559 TF or 4754 AD trucks. 1953 to 1960 F100's have a wheel base advantage, at 110ish, compared to the 114-115 of most others. 4754 AD Chevs are a little narrow in the front, so fitting a wide tire is tough with stock fenders. Weight may also be a factor. F100's are lightest usually around 3300 lbs. AD and TF chevs are usually in the 3400-3500 lb range, and the 63-72 chev's are in the 3500-3700 range. There are plenty of great parts for any choice, so choose the one that you really like. Consider all options for the build. Bolt-ons, complete Ft & Rr suspension packages, and/or full chassis. At the big end, a full chassis looks expensive, but compare apples to apples. The most expensive thing to do is to continue to upgrade. Starting with parts "A" and "B" and later changing them to parts "C" and "D".

    You could build a pretty bad ass TF with a stock frame, second gen (79-81 are best) Camaro IFS swap (use a No Limit video) and a rear C-4 vette IRS with a kit from Flat Out or others. Box and X the chassis with our No Limit X kit. Rebuild the IFS with urethane and a monster sway bar from PST and use some Hawk pads all around. I did this in the 90's on a '58. It was an awesome canyon carver. It will cost around 5k but takes a LOT of labor.

    On the other end, you could buy a full chassis. A true complete roller can be done smartly for appx 12,500. Yes, it's $$, but the time and labor is WAY less. Remember to count everything when you plan. brakes, steering, gear set, axles, brake plumbing, P/B system, brake valving, motor and trans mounts, .........

    In the middle is the wide variety of IFS and rear suspension kits for all trucks. All I will say is do your homework, and don't shop on price first. Study the spindle and brake assembly, this will tell you a lot about what it really is, and what it's abilities really are. One more plug, Please consider No Limit products during your search. Have fun with your truck, and keep the kids involved.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2017
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    10

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    Thank you Rob I appreciate your help. Your product has definitely proben itself. I wish I could afford your IFS for my 56 right now. So I don’t have to mess with the straight axle. So I’m thinking I can get the dropepdnaxle going and then upgrade later I guess. So once I upgrade coilovers is my best option correct?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    10

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    Hey Guys I was just wondering. If the camaro suspension is an option would that be the way to go or would it still better to go with the wide ride. The reason is I’m asking is because I have a frame with the camaro clip welded in already. In needs to be taken down and out in a machine to see if it will align. And I know it needs new ball joints. The other bushings look fairly new. So I’m assuming if I do use that I would upgrade to coilovers correct? Leave the stock control arms? Upgrade the steering box and possibly tie rod? Is all that correct. So since I have the frame already and if it’s good would that be better. Or is it smarter and better to just wait and not mess with that frame and save up until I can do the wide ride? Thanks guys I really appreciate the advice

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    135

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    The other C10 years to consider are the 73 up. 67-72 C10's are getting up there price wise. Rust buckets are reasonable but take a lot of work to fix properly. Rust free cabs and original front sheet metal expensive. A large share of long boxes are getting converted to short boxes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jbm56 View Post
    Hey Guys I was just wondering. If the camaro suspension is an option would that be the way to go or would it still better to go with the wide ride. The reason is I’m asking is because I have a frame with the camaro clip welded in already. In needs to be taken down and out in a machine to see if it will align. And I know it needs new ball joints. The other bushings look fairly new. So I’m assuming if I do use that I would upgrade to coilovers correct? Leave the stock control arms? Upgrade the steering box and possibly tie rod? Is all that correct. So since I have the frame already and if it’s good would that be better. Or is it smarter and better to just wait and not mess with that frame and save up until I can do the wide ride? Thanks guys I really appreciate the advice
    I think the real answer to your question is twofold. First, weight your time vs cost. Wide ride is more cost and less time. You can save by sticking with what you have and spending more time making it all straight. Ultimately, it doesn't sound like there is a ton of time savings in this scenario since you need to straighten what you have. Second, think seriously about how competitive you plan to be down the road. If you really want to push the beast hard and carve up corners, wide ride is a no-brainer. Rob has a brilliant track record of success making these trucks do things they weren't originally designed for. Really think hard about this one. I believe everyone else will agree when I say this, nobody starts out wanting to be the most competitive at autox, but it's just so addicting. And you are at a good point now to do major work without having to tear it all down twice.

    As for coilovers...yet another no-brainer to me. Better spring selection and ride control makes this practically mandatory for a handling focused vehicle. I'll say from first hand experience that a good suspension setup will make even a mediocre vehicle much more fun.

  10. #10
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    Oct 2017
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    10

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    My main goal is too get my 2 small kids involved and helping me out with this truck. And since it hasnít went very well yet, due to the previous builder. I want to get it to where I can at least drive it and work on it with them as I go. I want it to ride great. Daily driver, around corners, long trips to the beach, they the mountains whatever it may be. I want tit to ride great and handle great. As of right now I need to run brake lines add a booster and master cylinder and weld the rear spring perches on the axle. All this is for my stock frame with the dropped axle. My thoughts were to get this one going and drive it like that. And work on everything else. Then if I donít like that suspension I can add a aftermarket mustang 2 style. Or if you think thatís a waste of time to use the axle then I can wait. I have another frame with the camaro clip welded onto it already. I know the ball joints are bad. But it sots super high. Iíll post some pics and see what you guys think. Please let me know what direction you guys would go or doc I might not even take it to the track but if I do I want it to handle and ride good. But main thing is a great riding truck everyday
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  11. #11
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    Oct 2017
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    10

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    More pics
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    135

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    My .02.

    I would remove the front springs and shocks. Get some 1/2" threaded rod in place of the shock. Adjust the front end down to your desired ride height then take it to the alignment shop to see if caster and camber can be set to spec. Then also they can measure from the rear axle to the front wheels to see if the clip is welded on square.
    The good thing about the Camaro clip is that their a ton of aftermarket support.

  13. #13
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    Sep 2017
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    32

    Default

    Very cool Project!!


  14. #14
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    Aug 2010
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    now In Dandridge, Tn.
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    Not terrible. From the picts, I call that an "Overlap" graft. Not the ideal way, but this method is a lot easier for someone to get it in straight. So, you odds are going up. To the installers credit, all things considered, the front bumper/core support mount is way better than most, if the metal lines up. Keep this in mind. The chassis jobs can be separated (in thought). Job-1, hold the front and rear suspension in the correct locations (can be checked with a tape measure and at the alignment shop) Job-2, Hold the body together, in the right place over the wheels/tires. So, you can always mod the front core and bumper mounts to fit the sheet metal. BTW, this is 2nd gen Camaro IFS, and, the sub wasn't cut in relation to the suspension mounting points. If it was installed square, it will align with no problem. ** Tape measure - from the center of the front cab mount hole to the center of the shock hole on the sub, pass and drivers side straight forward. Then, cross measure from the same points. Pass cab mount to the drivers side shock hole and vice-versa. If you are within a 1/16, or even an 1/8" side to side, it's good to go. Next, set it on four jack stands, under the front cab mounts and just in front of the 'front' mount for the rear leaf. Shim to make the frame level (side to side) at these two points. Now, check the chassis in three more places. 1. the very back bed mount 2. the top of the upper A-Arm mounts, 3. The front bumper or core support mounts. If it is within the 'bubble' on the level, it will be OK. And if so, use it.

    My .02 on the subs. Just rebuild it. I used to get kits from Kanter or PST. Just use the rubber for a cruiser, urethane for more perf. While agree with the coil-over positive comments, I an not a fan of coil-overs on GM subs, as they reduce the amount of wheel travel available. There are lots of good coil springs available. I like the Eiboch 1" drop variable rate springs. Use a good non adjustable shock. ridetech, Bilstein,...... to hard to get to the knobs on these, so you won't take advantage of the $$ spent. Brakes are good, maybe some good (Hawk) pads. If you want it lower, get some drop spindles. Get a big Helwig swaybar. (or another, but 1 1/8"+) and go. I would build this chassis instead of the straight axle chassis for the cruiser/driver, and save your nice uncut chassis for the next one. This will drive way better that the S.A., so you will drive and enjoy it more. We have a dvd #102 That shows how to mod the OE rear springs/shackles to make it ride nice and drop the back. Hope this helps, keep Truckin!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Springs, Texas
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    FWIW I have a No Limit chassis here in my shop and it is a work of art. The fabrication quality is excellent, among the best that I have seen. Appears to be very well engineered.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1969 Camaro convertible - LS3 4L65E Ridetech Level 2 Tru-Turn - sold
    1959 El Camino
    1969 Mustang Sportsroof
    1956 Cameo - full C5 suspension/drivetrain

  16. #16
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    Aug 2010
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    now In Dandridge, Tn.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhutton View Post
    FWIW I have a No Limit chassis here in my shop and it is a work of art. The fabrication quality is excellent, among the best that I have seen. Appears to be very well engineered.

    Don
    Thanks for the compliment Don. Hope you share some picts of the build.





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