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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    Kane county Illinois
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    Default EFI conversion classic Mustang

    I'm considering converting my classic Mustang to electronic fuel injection. I have a 67 Fastback Mustang and I'm curious as to how many of you chose to do this conversion, what brand and model unit did you use, what did you decide for a fuel delivery system, what was the initial cost what was the end cost any particular problems you had and would you do it again?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Indpls, IN
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    I haven't converted a Mustang to EFI. But, I am finishing a 66 F100 over to a 5.0 EFI now. Using a Ron Francis wiring harness. It seems to be running great so far.

    I was thinking about converting my Falcon over next. I would like to try FiTech. I would go with a Intank high pressure pump.

    Good Luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    I agree with Jetfixr320. I would use FITech with my car if you were naturally aspirated. It is simple and easy to install.

    I have a 68 Mustang that I converted to EFI but it has a lot more going on. Boost and Meth injection are just a couple things. I started out using an SCT chip with a factory computer then when I paid mounds of money for tuning and still wouldn't run right I switched it all to an Accel DFI system. That was great until they got purchased and the product line discontinued along with it support is now non-existent. I now can't load the software on any modern computer and am left with on of 2 guys that have the software loaded on old computers. I have been recently looking at the Haltech 950 for my car just so that I can tune it. The cost is much lower than a new Holley system but is fairly generic and would require tuning abilities by you or a tuner.

    I used a tanks in in tank pump setup and really like it. It is much better than listening to an electric pump running along the frame rail.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    The Druid City
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    13,812
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    Tanks Inc makes a drop in tank with an in-tank pump. I use it on my 67 Cougar and it has worked well. I would opt for the no pump option and get a DW 200 (or whatever size you need) pump. The DW pumps are very quiet.

    I would go with the Holley Sniper system, but people have done well with other systems.

    Andrew
    1970 GTO Version 2.0
    1967 Cougar build
    GM High-Tech Performance feature
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    "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Mesa, Az
    Posts
    179

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    Ive installed 2 Sniper units and very impressed with how easy it was. I'm a firm believer of in tank fuel pumps. Have a 69 Mach 1 conversion coming in soon. Hopefully using the in tank system again.
    -Paul
    1969 Camaro "Reckn8"- LS7/C4 Front and Rear
    1965 Oldsmobile F/85 LS6 W/Maggie, 6-speed,Ride Tech, Baer brakes
    1978 Blazer 2 wheel drive with LS power

    1971 Chevy C/10 Factory A/C long bed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    218

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    Sniper here, works great. Very adjustable. Definitely bite the bullet and go with a new EFI tank.
    70 GTO - 406/200-4R
    70 Firebird project - 455/400
    69 Mustang sportsroof project - 390/C6

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    421

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    I converted a 67 fairlane to efi on the cheap. Ended up fabbing my own fuel module using a dw200 pump. Also built a "bread tray" type baffle with trap doors that's welded inside the tank now. May be more work than you are looking to do, but it functions very well, and I get no fuel starvation even at extremely low fuel levels.

    I also used 14 ga sheet metal to replace the section on the top of the tank that I cut out with a 1/8 in steel backing ring where the module mounts and the seal is excellent using nothing more than a ring of cork gasket cut to match.

    The rest of the system was steel lines with an fittings and a small amount of earls vapor gaurd hose between the frame and engine. Think I kept it around $300 for the whole system.

    Fuel stuff adds up quick if you dont put a bit of thought into it.
    Zach

    "It so repulsive to see such a beautiful 1970 Mustang, with the other teams engine transplanted into it. I know that car would spit that thing out if it could. Just ruined it, when everything else about the car is so nice." - Bossed

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    sw Kansas
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    Everything I own has been converted, none the easy way. The new stand alone 4 barrel units are so slick, for most users, there's no other choice. 2 thoughts: the 1st is the only long term way is pump in tank. These pumps don't suck, they only push. Having the inlet in fuel is important. The fuel is also what cools the pump. No.2: Don't put in too large a pump. Alot of the aftermarket kits have pumps with huge capacity pumps. That means the pump will bypass fuel and aerate the fuel. It is possible to vapor lock a system with that. If you have 300 hp. , find the chart and get a pump that isn't way larger. One of my friends had a fitech that comes with a huge pump. He had around 300hp. The fuel command center vaporlocked. He moved the pump to the tank and that cured most of it. I used a Painless harness on my 347 and modified the factory harness on 2 4.6 conversions.





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