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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    604
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    1984 "Rustang" GT (Slow Build)

    Hello everyone!

    I'm going to start this off by saying this will probably be one of the slower builds on this website. I've been out of school less than 2 years, and have done many things that eat up money like buying a house, new cars, etc... As a result, I don't have as many funds to devote to this project as I would like at the moment. However, this has also dictated the way I am building this car, and I'm confident that given my education and abilities I will be able to make a good performing vehicle. While this is a budget build right now, i will not skimp on safety items, and as more funds become available the project will improve.



    Now, some background on the car. It is a 1984 Mustang GT, 5 Speed with T Tops! A friend of my dads bought this car back in in 1986 when it was only 2 years only and had about 20k miles on it. He was in school at the time, and he drove it for the next 9 years and put about 100k on the clock. In 1995 or 1996, he stopped driving the car because it was difficult and expensive to find tires for it (I'll explain later), so he parked the car and got something else to replace it. The car then proceeded to sit outside for the next 21 years in the Arizona sun, and the results are predictable.

    20160827_075050 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160827_075156 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr



    This is slightly sad, because the car was in good running shape when it was parked, if it had only been in a garage it would look great! Anyways, I was offered the car for cheap and couldn't say no since I was in the market for a project of some kind. $1000 later, I was the proud new owner of what my co-worker dubbed "The Rustang".


    20160828_175303 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160828_175311 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160828_175333 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160828_175336 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160828_175348 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    And thus, the project began.

    In my next posts I will be recapping what has been done to the car in the past 1.5 years since I bought it. Once I'm caught up to present I will be posting as things happen!

    Thanks for checking it out!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Resurrecting the Dead

    Myself and a friend went to drag the Rustang home from its resting place. We got it back to my parents house and hosed off most of the dirt that had built up. Since the car had been running when it was parked, we decided that we should try to get it running. So we headed to Napa for a battery and a serpentine belt to get it going. We installed both of those items, but the car would not turn over with the key. I used a jumper wire on the Ford starter relay, and the motor started cranking with good speed, so we assumed that something was wrong with the ignition switch.

    As it turns out, Fox Body Mustangs had a recall on them because the ignition switches had a tendency to fall apart, which mine had done. My car had been parked for so long it wasn't in the DMV computer when the recall was sent. Here's a picture of what I found when I pulled the column over off. The new switch is on the right for comparison.

    20160828_102029 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    Once that was replaced, the car would crank with the key like it should. So we made sure it was full of oil, poured some gas in the carb, and filled the radiator with water. And after 20 years of sitting, the car fired up like it had only been a day. I was cheering, until I saw the puddle of water forming under the car and the squealing sound started under the hood. The puddle under the car was caused by the steel freeze plugs that had rusted until they were paper thin. The squealing I thought came from the alternator, but closer inspection showed that it was actually the belt on the water pump pulley, the pump would not turn.

    So I was still happy, but I knew the motor would have to come out to replace those freeze plugs. I was ok with this, the motor was a mess and I wanted to clean it anyways.

    20160907_181748 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    So, I towed the car to my house in Yuma and proceeded to pull the motor out.

    20160914_191918 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160914_191927 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160915_215130 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    More coming soon!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Tear Down

    Once I got the motor out, I decided that while it was out I would give it a quick go through and re-gasket it so it wouldn't leak everywhere, it is a Ford after all lol.

    Everything on the top end was looking pretty good for having 125K on it. However, I was a little worried but the amount of junk in the thermostat opening.

    20160920_064457 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160920_064449 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160920_182550 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    This was where things took a slight turn for the worse. Please, if a car is going to be parked, make sure the cooling system is drained so this doesn't happen to somebody down the road. On the plus side, I figured out why the water pump would not turn. I also managed to snap off several of the water pump bolts while I was at it, they were frozen in place.

    20160920_182556 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160920_182603 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    After about 4 hours of fire, hammers, and vise grips I was able to get the timing cover off. Funny thing is once the cover was off the bolts turned out by hand, they were seized in place by the bolts rusting in the housing and expanding. I did manage to break the cover getting it off, so I added that to the list of replacement parts needed.

    20160922_185952 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20160922_185922 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Tear Down Pt .2

    I continued with the engine teardown, and at this point nothing had thrown a red flag aside from the water pump.

    Valvetrain was in good shape. I kept it organized as I planned on putting it back in.

    20161108_181119 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The heads followed shortly, they needed a good cleaning and some valve seals.

    20161108_181131 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    And finally only the rotating assembly was left. Since the motor didn't smoke when I ran it, I just wanted to check the #8 rod & #5 main bearings for wear before I cleaned it up and put it back together.

    20161108_181106 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    This was the final red flag for this engine. The crank was not the worst I had ever seen, some very fine grooves on the rod end. The main looked smooth.

    20161108_173817 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20161108_173820 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    However, the bearings told a different story...

    20161108_173828 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20161108_173832 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    This is when I told myself I couldn't put this engine back in as it was and be happy with myself. So, I took the pistons & crank out to see about getting the block machined.

    20161109_175834 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20161109_175840 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Burbs of Detroit
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    1,643
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    Man- I haven't seen a TRX wheel in years- Does Michlin even make TRX tires anymore?
    Greg Fast
    (yes, the last name is spelled correctly)

    1970 Camaro RS Clone
    1984 el Camino
    1973 MGB vintage E/Prod race car
    (Soon to be an SCCA H/Prod limited prep)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Chit-ca-go
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    380
    Absolutely love these early fox body Mustangs! IMO, you got a great project car to start with for the money. I'd take one in a 'heartbeat'. How are the floors?
    1971 Firebird
    2017 Slipstream SS

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twentyover View Post
    Man- I haven't seen a TRX wheel in years- Does Michlin even make TRX tires anymore?
    In short, no. Coker Tire bought all of the stock Michelin had when they stopped production and has been selling them since then. Now you can buy 30 year old tires for the low price of $300 each! lol


    Quote Originally Posted by cpd004 View Post
    Absolutely love these early fox body Mustangs! IMO, you got a great project car to start with for the money. I'd take one in a 'heartbeat'. How are the floors?
    Thanks! The floors are solid, this is a true Arizona car, the rust is limited to surface rust from the burned up paint. The body is straight aside from the usual dents & dings from the years.
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    SW KS
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    Country Flag: United States
    I'd think at this point, you've got some really good head, cam and intake options, and while you've got the rotating assembly out, you could do a 331. Then paint it up to look original and put it under the OG air cleaner.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Choices

    At this time I set about seeing what my options for rebuilding the engine were. Yuma does not have much to offer in terms of machine shops compared to other places, but there are 3 in town. I selected one and took my engine down for them to take a look at. They looked it over and said it was not in bad shape, but couldn't say if they would need to bore it or not. With a quote in hand, I started to weigh all of the options. In then end, I found a new motor for less than it would have cost to machine my current engine.

    20161201_174319 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20161201_174247 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The engine came out of a 87 Mustang. Being from an 87, it has the stronger block casting, roller cam provisions, and came with forged pistons from the factory. The guys I got it from had pulled it from the car his son wrecked and got it machined, planning to build a Cobra kit car. It then sat for almost as long as my car did. I got the motor and set about cleaning it up. The guy had the block tanked, new cam bearings, and cylinders honed back in the sat. After a bit of cleanup effort, the block looked like it had survived its long wait. I polished the lifter valley, got the block painted up and stuck new freeze plugs in it.

    The only part of the engine that was missing was the crank, he said he had sold it for some reason after he got it turned. So, I found a replacement crank and set about starting to build the engine.

    20170104_211527 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Needing to keep in my budget, I started looking for a cam. Part of the reason I had looked for a roller block was that there are more cams available for lower prices, and roller cams have many other benefits that made it worth it. After trolling Craigslist, I came across a guy with a Trick Flow Stage II cam that he had run in his drag car. He made 2 passes on the cam and decided it wasn't big enough for his engine, so he took it out. I got it for $50. Specs are .542 Intake / .563 Exhaust with 224/232 @0.050. Probably too big for my engine, but it was cheap.

    20170110_172404 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170110_181347 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I installed it with stock type Ford lifter and dog bones. I had no idea if the cam would clear my pistons, but I would cross that bridge when I got to it.
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Build Pt. 2

    The motor I bought came with the stock bottom end components, standard bore forged pistons. For the insurance, I took them to the machine shop and had ARP rod bolts installed so I knew the bottom end wouldn't come flying apart from the stock bolts failing. I cleaned up the pistons, they just had a bit of old carbon on them and I polished the tops while I was at it to help against any detonation.

    A Comp double roller timing set joined the cam and crank together. Don't worry. the Fram was only there to keep dirt out of the engine, I'll never run one on any of my engines.

    20170502_071154 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Luckily, the engine came with the timing cover as well since I had broken the original trying to get it off. All I had to do was open up the hole for the fuel pump since it was blocked off for the injected engine. A website called LMR has a nice set of timing cover hardware made for them by ARP, since all my bolts were junk I got one, very glad I did.

    20170502_183938 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    A new Melling oil pump went onto the bottom end. I went with a standard pump due to the tolerances my engine had when assembled, I didn't think a HV pump was necessary.

    20170502_183942 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    For a bit of bling, I painted the original oil pan with wrinkle paint and used some stainless cap screws to hold it in place. A one piece pan gasket was used.

    20170503_200833 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Final part was the harmonic balancer from the new engine, it was in good shape. With that, the short block was complete.

    20170503_205520 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbpldc View Post
    I'd think at this point, you've got some really good head, cam and intake options, and while you've got the rotating assembly out, you could do a 331. Then paint it up to look original and put it under the OG air cleaner.
    It's on my agenda to do a stroker, just wasn't in the budget at the time. Some day I will though!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Build Pt. 3

    It was time for the engine to receive a top end. The stock E7TE heads that came with my engine were in rough shape, not sure why. ANd I wasn't even contemplating using the anemic E4 heads from my original motor. So, a trip to a salvage yard and $50 later I had these:

    20161126_161459 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20161227_115755 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    A set of GT40P heads off a mid 90s Explorer. While it doesn't sound like much, they are actually the best flowing small block Ford heads to ever leave the factory aside from the Boss 302 Cleveland heads. Their Achilles heel is that the stock springs can only support a max of about .450 valve lift, which isn't good for anything performance oriented. Also, stock 5.0 Ford heads are pedestal mount rockers that use a wimpy 5/16" bolts and are known to snap with high lift. With help from a friend, I machined the heads to accept studs and guide plates so I could have a solid valve train.

    20161231_162504 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I gave them a coat of paint

    20170111_190012 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I pulled out all the valves and cleaned all the carbon of them.

    20170111_180025 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170111_180030 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Once they were clean I lapped them all and installed them with my new spring package. Viton seals were used, and the springs were all shimmed so they had the correct installed height. Spring pack came from Alex's Parts, they're good to .580 lift and +230 duration. They use a special valve keeper for the exhaust valves unique to the GT40P since I didn't want to change valves. ARP studs & AFR guide plates were used.

    20170511_182107 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The heads were installed with Felpro gaskets. The only factor I couldn't measure was how far the pistons were in the hole, but based on all my other measurements and some internet research the engine should be right about 9.5:1 compression.

    20170511_210622 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    And more used parts, a set of Ford Motorsport shorty headers I got from a co-worker. GT40P heads are notorious for having spark plug clearance problems, these are one of the known good headers. Who would have guessed, the Ford parts fit right! Headman & Hooker could learn a thing or two from them.

    20170511_211727 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Build Pt. 4

    Next steps for the engine was to complete the top end. For an intake I went with a Weiand Stealth because it fit my budget, and had the widest operating range of all the dual plane intakes I looked at. I got a set of Felpro intake gaskets that matched the GT40P heads nearly perfectly, but the fit on the intake left something to be desired. So I proceeded to port match the intake, and while I was at it did a mild porting job & smoothed the runners.

    20170520_104915 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170520_104956 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170520_105036 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170520_105040 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    To finish the valve train I got a set of Comp roller rockers. Not the best available, but they were reasonably priced and fit good. I checked my piston to valve clearance before the heads were put on for good and had tons of clearance, even with the big cam. I also had measured for the correct push rod length, and ordered some in the correct length from Trick Flow. I also splurged on ARP studs for the intake manifold.

    20170523_182123 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170524_211723 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170524_211735 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    To button up the engine, a Holley 600 & tall valve covers. I had planned on using the original valve covers that I cleaned up to match the oil pan, but they didn't clear the rockers.

    20170524_213039 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The engine was now ready to go into the car!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Car Updates

    After taking the time on the engine, I finally returned my attention to the rest of the car. In the interest of getting rid of the mess in the engine bay, I started by removing all of the emissions related equipment. Luckily for me, Yuma does not require emissions testing, so I'm free to do what I want!

    Had to pull the fender off to get the emissions parts that were buried out there.

    20170509_205440 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170511_065135 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Firewall junk had to go.

    20170517_173711 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Hard to tell, but I actually removed a lot of necessary parts. I treated the engine bay to a pressure washing to blast most of the crud off, and called it good enough. I elected not to paint it because I was not fully clearing the engine bay, so I couldn't reach everywhere with paint.

    20170518_070645 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The other big project I took on was to replace the heater core. When I was removing the engine, I tried to take off the heater lines, which succeeded in ripping out the hose ends. Getting to the heater core of a Fox Body involves removing the entire dash. I didn't take pictures of the whole process, but right about here I was asking myself what I had gotten myself into?

    20170608_213407 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    In the end, it went back together intact.
    20171005_210531 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Engine Prep & Install

    Next step was to get the engine prepped to go in. I wanted to drop the engine in with all the accessories & starter already attached, so I installed them all onto the engine.

    20170718_211958 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The same co-worker that sold me the headers also let me have the x-pipe & trans cross member for a good price. Since my car was originally a single exhaust car, the cross member only had one bump in it for pipes to go and wouldn't work. The x-pipe took slight modification since his engine was a little different than mine. I cut one of the pipes & rotated it to line up better, then borrowed a friends welder and put it back together.

    20170718_211934 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The next major thing to change was out back. Being a 1984 my car was too old to have the 8.8 rear axle from the factory, it had the old 7.5 that are notorious for exploding even with mild engines. It took me a couple weeks of trolling Craigslist, but I finally found a suitable axle and bought it. Much to my delight, the new 8.8 had 3.27 gears and a posi inside it already. I took some time to rattlecan rebuild it and shoved it under the car.

    20170724_210125 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170726_213106 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20170727_211452 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    There were no brakes on the 8.8, and the old ones were shot, so I just put some stock replacement shoes on the axle and called it good for now. I also threw new pads in the front with new rubber lines. The master cylinder was also junk, and was replaced at this time.

    20170731_193627 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Now, an issue that I knew early on reared it's head again, the wonderful TRX wheels. For those of you who don't know, in the 80's everybody thought the entire auto world was going metric, including wheels. So, they started making metric wheels & tires, Michelin being the main source of tires. This car was equipped with the TRX handling package, which meant if got the metric wheels. As it turns out, metric wheels & tires never caught on and the manufacturers returned to SAE sizes. It is nearly impossible to find tires for these wheels any more, Coker Tire was the only place I found, and they wanted $300 a piece for 20 year old tires.

    So a solution was needed, and more Craigslist trolling resulted in a $40 set of 16" Pony wheels. They look like hell, so they fit the car perfectly right now. I threw on the cheapest tires I could get (not pictured) with intentions of burning them off for future plans.

    20170802_212006 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    Now, the moment of truth had arrived, installing the engine. It dropped in with no fuss and looked slightly out of place compared to the unfinished engine bay, but that's how it is! The trans was installed from below, I put a new Ram HDX clutch in to connect the two along with new clutch cable, quadrant, and adjuster. Now just had to get it running!

    20170803_200050 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    It lives!

    After getting the engine into it's new home, all the rest of the required components had to go in. The stock radiator was put in for now with plans on changing it in the future. I had a set of Accel Super Wires laying around that I built to fit my engine. The Holley carb that I had from our Chevelle went on, and I purchased a Pertronix Flame Thrower 3 distributor to make the spark. It is a ready to run distributor with a built in adjustable rev limiter, it's a very nice part for the money.

    This picture is not the best, I cobbled the engine bay together just to get it to run. I went back later and cleaned it up.

    20171215_182829 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    After that, it was time to bring it to life. After 20+ years of sitting, it was running! I had only one slight hiccup with the power steering having air in the lines, but other wise it went well! I ran it for a while to break it in, then worked on getting it to idle. I was very pleased with how it sounded.




    Shortly after I got it running I was off for the Christmas holiday, so I loaded the car onto a trailer and drug it back to my parents house to make it road worthy. I fixed the power steering, solved an issue with the electrical system that wasn't letting it charge, stopped a fuel leak, and many more small tasks. Among those jobs, I got some mufflers to install. In keeping with my budget theme, I found a set of $50 Spintech mufflers on craigslist for a Fox Body. I welded some turn downs on them and got them in place. They were small so I expected the car to be loud, but it's actually not as much as I expected. It still has a rumble at idle, but has a nice crack when you wind it up.



    Once all that was done, the car was safe to drive and I began to put miles on it. I even took it to a Friday Night Drag event at Wild Horse Pass (Firebird) just for fun. The car ran a 14.3 @103. Not the fastest there's ever been, I couldn't get the car to hook off the line with the cheap tires I put on it. But I had a good time and the car drove itself home after making about 10 passes, and I now have a baseline for the future.

    More to come shortly, Phase 2 of the Rustang build is getting ready to start soon.
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    SW KS
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    Excellent choice on the mufflers. Can't wait to see what's next.

    Chris

  18. #18
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    Mar 2014
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbpldc View Post
    Excellent choice on the mufflers. Can't wait to see what's next.

    Chris
    Thanks! It's hard to pick mufflers without hearing them in person before buying, but this time it worked out good!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  19. #19
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    Mar 2014
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    Country Flag: United States

    Phase 1 Upgrades Begin

    Shortly after getting the car road worthy I began to improve the car. The original radiator that I had in the car began to leak as expected, so a new aluminum unit was purchased from LMR. Definitely a cheaper radiator, but for the price it is hard to beat.

    20180326_195953 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I also inherited the Demon carb that we took off our Chevelle when we did the EFI conversion. I got it installed and am working on tuning it which I've never done before.

    20180212_202839 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I have even driven the Rustang to work a couple of times. For those that don't know I work for GM, so I get a lot of flack for having a Ford lol

    20180105_080544 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    In the meantime, I began to collect parts for the Phase 1 upgrades. I purchased the entire suspension setup from a 95 Cobra Mustang to swap into my Rustang. This single purchase got me most of the items I need to do my 5 lug swap, I still need to get some Fox length axles and a few other parts. Wheels are the other big item I need to get, still not sure what I'm going to do at this point.

    20180313_064020 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20180313_064043 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    The guy was even nice enough to get the rotors turned for me before I got it. Just need to clean them up and they're ready to go on.

    20180313_064025 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr

    20180313_064035 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    I'm currently working on powder coating the larger items like the Calipers & brackets. All the other items that were not getting coated were media blasted and coated with epoxy chassis paint. Things are starting to look good!

    20180409_205218 by Nelson Wallace, on Flickr


    At this point, the build thread is caught up to the present and the rate of updates will most likely slow down. I'm still gathering parts for Phase 1, and driving the car and enjoying it. I've done some other little things like remove the headliner and start to replace it. It had fallen down and was hitting me in the head while I was driving, not ok lol.

    Thanks for stopping by!
    Nelson
    1969 Chevelle "Cone Smasher" Family Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...uot?highlight=

    1984 "Rustang" GT, 5.0, 5 Speed Project
    https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...T-(Slow-Build)

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    41
    Country Flag: United States
    Great work so far. The GT-40Ps are good heads for torque. I ran a set on a 331 I built for my '88GT and it was a really fun car to drive. I ran a TFS Stage 1 cam in that car and it put out enough power to be fun and got really great gas mileage - usually over 21 MPG even with city driving. Having said that, the P's ran out of breath above 5K rpm on that set up.

    It should be really fun car to drive, and you can always add more power with a new set of TFS or AFR heads down the road.

    Keep the updates coming

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