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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT
    Power steering coolers only really needed in racing situations.
    Agreed. Also from experience. Street cars shouldn't need ps coolers.

    If you are having ps heat problems while street driving, you've got a design issue (component mismatch, pump output) or something has failed (hose, pump, servo, box, rack, etc.).
    John Parsons



    II Much Fabrication's Blog -- New products, Fabrication sequences, etc.

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  2. #22
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    Don't have any problems with it, just lookin out to not experiencing any heat problems next year. Steering box is 46 years old and I'll probably replace it next year. I have just installed a better trans cooler so figured why not install a PS cooler on the opposite side as well.

    Car will have a 450-500hp engine and new 3000rpm stalled TH350 next year as well as new front suspension. Heat build up will be much greater than it is now.

  3. #23
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    I used heat sensitive stickers on my fluid reservoir from Pegasus. A little over 200, and the lucas fluid smelled burnt but never boiled over. I don't see how you can ever have power steering or brake fluid be too cool (relatively speaking). It is just hydraulics, not motor oil. I'd be concerned with premature rack or pump seal failures with fluid over 200. I'd like to see it closer to 150 -180.

  4. #24
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    Like I said before.... the guy over at Lee power steering, when they were still in business before he retired, said 180 to 200 was ideal and it could go as hot as 220 to 230 max. I use a 24 inch Derale frame rail transmission cooler mounted in front of my radiator on my power steering.

    I also use the redline synthetic power steering fluid since it can handle higher Temps.

  5. #25
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    I've used an aftermarket, bolt on trans cooler as a inline power steering cooler (on the return line) for years. I use Redline synthetic fluid . I don't know the temperature it reaches, but I haven't burned the pump up yet. I did this modification in response to a couple of guys overheating and melting the reservoir loose from their stock pumps at the Year One Experience events at Road Atlanta back in 2006. The failures occurred after a good bit of autocross and road course on Road Atlanta during a hot day. I'm curious about the temperature needing to be 212' plus to boil the water out , maybe I should research this.
    Jeff Tate
    U.S.A.
    "The best thing about participating in these events is that you get to hang out with a group of intelligent like minded people who live to achieve things in their lives. You won't find a lazy, mean, or dumb bone in their bodies." Bret Voelkel, RideTech

  6. #26
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    Power steering fluid doesn't need to deal with combustion by-products, so I don't see the need to run it really hot either. It is pretty much a closed system. There are plenty of hydraulic systems out there in industry that run cool. That being said, I have limited experience with power steering systems and would love to hear input from the experts.

  7. #27
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    I don't get why there is a deicated "power steering fluid" either. I use the same ATF as the trans, done so for years and works just fine.

  8. #28
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    What John said! So long as you run the return line through the cooler and not the high pressure line.

    Quote Originally Posted by parsonsj View Post
    No, of course not. It works fine -- I've done exactly that with a C&R setup on my 69 Camaro LS9 project and on my C6 Z06.

    What do these "online" people have against such a good idea?
    Steve Hayes
    "Dust Off"
    68 Camaro

    Speed has never killed anyone. Suddenly becoming stationary, that's what gets you!
    "Jeremy Clarkson"

  9. #29
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    Nov 2016
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    I also have 70 Camaro with a BeCool radiator that has the auto trans cooler option and I'm considering running my pwr str fluid through this system. One day after running a session on the road course I happened to touch the remote tank and it seemed pretty hot but without temp reading I have no idea how hot it really was. I'm not sure about having boil off the moisture. Our street driven cars never get that warm and we just don't have pwr str problems on street cars. So if we plumb through the radiator the fluid should run parallel temps to your water temp. It will warm up quicker and then maintain that temp. I believe I will get some temp strips and put on my fluid tank to monitor. I run the short 1.9mi 14 turn Blackhawk Farms raceway and occasional Road America plus a couple parking lot autoX events so the steering gets a fair workout from the turning and the high rpm ( which also adds heat ) .
    Mike

    I'm old, gray hair, balding, and retired, and I'm still wrenching on cars. I thought wisdom came with old age.

    70 Camaro, 406 sb, 6spd, 4:10 gear, BMR Suspension


  10. #30
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    I'm going to try using the auto trans cooler for my P/S now that I am converting from auto to manual. Based on the radiator design of the LS, the water surrounding the cooler would actually be cooler than engine temp since it would have already gone through one pass of the dual pass radiator. Based on temp readings, it should be less than 160.

    I have also been told that a P/S cooler is not necessary on a street car, but trips through the tail of the dragon and surrounding areas put a big load on your P/S and are probably close to the heat load caused by autocross.
    67 Ford Galaxie
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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by xavier296 View Post
    I have also been told that a P/S cooler is not necessary on a street car, but trips through the tail of the dragon and surrounding areas put a big load on your P/S and are probably close to the heat load caused by autocross.
    Depends on the application, this was after a 15 mile normal street drive on an 80F day. Without a cooler the system essentially has no way to dissipate any heat with the exception of the box acting as a heat sink. I've since added a cooler, it was about 100F.

    1300psi PSC Motorsports pump and a Borgeson box.

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  12. #32
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    Strictly speaking a PS cooler may not be necessary for street use, but a PS cooler is never a bad idea.
    Steve Hayes
    "Dust Off"
    68 Camaro

    Speed has never killed anyone. Suddenly becoming stationary, that's what gets you!
    "Jeremy Clarkson"

  13. #33
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    Okay, I'll ask the dumb question since I've never run a cooler on my power steering before. I feel I need to add one because of the long road racing events (as compared to an autocross event) that I will be running.

    Do I connect the cooler to the low pressure return from the steering box to the reservoir? I will be using the transmission cooler in the radiator. I don't want to over-pressure and burst it.

  14. #34
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    The return side from the box or rack runs through the cooler and then back to the reservoir. The cooler is in the low pressure line.
    Donny

    Support your local hot rod shop!

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontlifttoshift View Post
    The return side from the box or rack runs through the cooler and then back to the reservoir. The cooler is in the low pressure line.
    Thanks Donny.

  16. #36
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    You dont really need to reach 212 degrees to get rid of moisture. Any heat will cause evaporation.
    67 Camaro RS that will be faster than anything Mary owns.

  17. #37
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    ....and a few words of wisdom from Tom @ Lee's when he was in the old shop in Sun Valley.

    1) Use the GM power steering fluid. Nothing else for street and mild racing.
    2) Use a power steering cooler.
    3) If using the older style P-pump, have it modified to run dry and use a remote reservoir if HPDE days are in the cards.
    4) Tune the pump cam ring size and pulley to match the intended use of the car. On the old P-pump Tom put in a smaller cam ring that cause an occasional low-speed groan with big/sticky tires, but cured the high engine speed overheat and fluid spitting from the reservoir. On the current CB pump the stock cam ring size was used but an upgraded shaft was installed as well as flipping the pump over and using a non-plastic KSE reservoir (LS1 accessory drive.) It still occasionally groans but it's no big deal, and never spits fluid even on high engine speed tracks.

    Every one of his suggestions worked out in practice as well, especially the GM fluid. It's far and away the best for reducing aeration and holding up to track days.
    Last edited by CarlC; 06-26-2018 at 08:32 AM.
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  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarlC View Post
    ....and a few words of wisdom from Tom @ Lee's when he was in the old shop in Sun Valley.

    1) Use the GM power steering fluid. Nothing else for street and mild racing.
    2) Use a power steering cooler.
    3) If using the older style P-pump, have it modified to run dry and use a remote reservoir if HPDE days are in the cards.
    4) Tune the pump cam ring size and pulley to match the intended use of the car. On the old P-pump Tom put in a smaller cam ring that cause an occasional low-speed groan with big/sticky tires, but cured the high engine speed overheat and fluid spitting from the reservoir. On the current CB pump the stock cam ring size was used but an upgraded shaft was installed as well as flipping the pump over and using a non-plastic KSE reservoir (LS1 accessory drive.) It still occasionally groans but it's no big deal, and never spits fluid even on high engine speed tracks.

    Every one of his suggestions worked out in practice as well, especially the GM fluid. It's far and away the best for reducing aeration and holding up to track days.
    Thanks for the tip on the GM power steering fluid.

    Don
    1969 Camaro - LSA 6L90E AME sub/IRS
    1969 Camaro convertible - LS3 4L65E Ridetech Level 2 Tru-Turn - sold
    1959 El Camino
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  19. #39
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    Maybe I will try the GM fluid. Currently have an AME sub with a DSE rack, running a stock C6 pump. Using the "auto trans cooler" on my radiator to cool the PS fluid and so far it has stayed at about 180 even on track days. Groans a bit when cold, but I was told that may be due to my high pressure line being too short to dampen the pump harmonics. Once it warns up all is well.

  20. #40
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    Before being schooled by Lee's I tried ATF and several other so-called power steering fluids and had a heck of a time getting the system to bleed well. With the GM fluid, dump it in the reservoir, turn the steering wheel lock-to-lock 20 times, and fire up the car. Done.

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