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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Grayslake IL
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    283 Hot starting probelms

    I have a 283 in my 1962 Chevy II. After a drive of half an hour or more the car doesn't like to crank over. The car is below or at 190 water temp when cruising. I shut it off (because im at the store or somehwere) come back after 10-15 minutes and will not crank. I'll turn the key and hear the electric fan kick on but otherwise no cranking at all. Connections on starter are not loose. What could be the issue? Starting getting too hot? It is a large original gm starter. Would a mini starter help this problem? Thanks for the input guys.
    I always tell others to take the high road, that way there's more room for me on the low road

    Erik Peterson
    1986 Monte Carlo SS Build Thread: https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...6-Nascarlo-2-0

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Fremont, CA
    Posts
    64
    Country Flag: United States
    Yeah, I'm having the same issue
    1969 Firebird 455HO, TH400, 12 Bolt 3:42, 17X9 Snowflakes w/ 275/40R17 Nitto's, Hugger Orange Imron, Aug 1987 Car Craft cover car.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mena, AR
    Posts
    286
    Country Flag: United States
    Are you using an original harness or aftermarket wire harness?


    Chris
    1967 ElCamino
    2004 Chevy SSR (my sons)
    1951 Chevy pickup(my sons)

    1967 Elky https://www.pro-touring.com/showthre...587-Evil-Angel

    1951 truck https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...3-year-old-son

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Grayslake IL
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    311
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    283 Hot starting probelms

    Original harness
    I always tell others to take the high road, that way there's more room for me on the low road

    Erik Peterson
    1986 Monte Carlo SS Build Thread: https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...6-Nascarlo-2-0

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    At The Lake
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    242
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    I have the same issue in my Pontiac as the starter is very close to the headers. Most likely your starter solenoid is over heated after a drive due to high under-hood temperatures. You could try wrapping the starter in a thermal blanket, or making a metal heat shield. I've also seen starters advertised that have a remote solenoid, though I'm not quite sure how that works.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Grayslake IL
    Posts
    311
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    283 Hot starting probelms

    Yeah the starter is close to the exhaust on mine, I tryed exhaust wrap to stop so much heat in that area but it had no effect.
    I always tell others to take the high road, that way there's more room for me on the low road

    Erik Peterson
    1986 Monte Carlo SS Build Thread: https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...6-Nascarlo-2-0

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    216
    Country Flag: Afghanistan
    Ethanol blended fuels boil at a much lower temp than traditional gas. Try a gas cool can it may work and its cheap.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    4,655
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    Quote Originally Posted by hectore3 View Post
    Ethanol blended fuels boil at a much lower temp than traditional gas. Try a gas cool can it may work and its cheap.
    Uhmm, I hate too tell you that fuel temp has nothing to do with a starter cranking over.
    Sounds like the starter is getting hot and the brushes aren't making good contact.
    If your careful, after removing the starter pull the back cover and inspect the brushes.
    Lee Abel
    AFTERMARKET PERFORMANCE

    1977 Chevy Monza 2+2:Project "Cheap Trick"
    1978 C10 Long bed , On air and trailer puller
    2006 Buell Blast ,Just a bike to ride and for mileage
    1966 Caprice 4dr Sports Roof fact.327/now 350/SOON 454???? Project "II Old,,,ZERO BUDGET OR LESS CAPRICE!"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    HILLBILLY HOLLYWOOD, TENNESSEE!!!
    Posts
    2,043
    Check your wiring.

    On a 70 Chevelle I previously owned there was a 4 volt drop from the battery at the right front of the car to the firewall bulkhead connector at the lower left firewall at the fuse box. The original wiring harness was just that bad.

    Your Nova wiring is not much different in routing and design than a basic Chevelle wiring harness. If it will not crank you have a wiring issue. On a 70 Chevelle there is a power wire that goes from a power junction point on the right front of the radiator support right behind the battery across the radiator support to the horn relay and then to the fuse box. Power to this junction point comes from the additional wire front the positive battery terminal through an additional factory added wire on the positive battery cable. This 12 gauge red wire had the 4 volt power drop from the junction point to the fuse box and provided part of the power to the fuse box. Low voltage no cranking since you cannot activate the starter solenoid. Pull the connector from the engine wiring harness to the fuse box at the firewall. You will need to loosen the 3/8 bolt to do this and use a good electrical terminal cleaner on the connections. Chances are good this connection has never been separated since the car was built. Also you might want to remove the actual fuse box from the inside firewall and check the backside of fuse box. I'll bet the connections are rusty as hell after all these years.

    Sounds like it may be time for a new front engine wiring harness and a good fuse box cleaning. That solved my problems!
    Mike

    Remember, "Drive Fast, Turn Heads, Break Hearts!"

    www.musclecardeals.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    ocala fl
    Posts
    260
    Country Flag: United States
    stock manifolds?? check the heat rizer valve.May sound funny but my brother in law had a pontiac with that problem and found out the heat rizer was blocked shut. He placed the starter twice before we found the problem. Also clean all your grounds especially negative ground at the motor block. look at the battery cables and look for corrosion inside the rubber covering as it will build up resistance when heat soaked. Also take a heavy 80 grit sand paper and sand inside the battery cable at battery and the battery terminals as all those wire brushes do is polish the corrosion. Those old cars were well known for excessive corrosion at or inside the cables as they got old. I think a lot of it was from the acid fumes coming out around the battery post as they could not complete seal at the posts