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View Full Version : What coilovers to pick? Rideteck, Qa1, Viking, Etc.



project87ss
01-02-2018, 05:41 PM
Im installing coilovers on my 71 camaro. It will be driven and I'm looking for handling over comfort. Want to keep it single adjustable for price since I'm on a budget. All input will be helpful. thanks

Yanchik
01-02-2018, 06:06 PM
I'm not experienced on coilovers, but I can tell you that Ridetech coilovers require their Front Lower StrongArms (reinforced control arms) because stock lowers wont be able to "handle the loads exerted by coilovers" which will cause your stock lowers to bottom out. So expect to drop an extra $650 for their StrongArms on top of the coilover cost.

Viking seems to have better reviews than the QA1, and I'm 99% sure it does not require a reinforced tubular lower arm, which means you can use your stock lower arms. This is the more cost effective one since you can save money by not buying lower arms. Hopefully the Vikings wont bottom out the stock arms.

From customer reviews and overall hpye, it seems to be: Ridetech>Viking>QA1
Hopefully others can chime in on this.

Josh@Ridetech
01-03-2018, 06:31 AM
I'm not experienced on coilovers, but I can tell you that Ridetech coilovers require their Front Lower StrongArms (reinforced control arms) because stock lowers wont be able to "handle the loads exerted by coilovers" which will cause your stock lowers to bottom out. So expect to drop an extra $650 for their StrongArms on top of the coilover cost.

Viking seems to have better reviews than the QA1, and I'm 99% sure it does not require a reinforced tubular lower arm, which means you can use your stock lower arms. This is the more cost effective one since you can save money by not buying lower arms. Hopefully the Vikings wont bottom out the stock arms.

From customer reviews and overall hpye, it seems to be: Ridetech>Viking>QA1
Hopefully others can chime in on this.

One of the big reasons that we recommend using our control arms is so you can use a longer stroke shock. Our arms have a dropped pocket built into them so we can use the longer shock to achieve a better ride quality/performance out of the setup. On a stock arm, you're limited to a short travel shock that won't perform as good. It's not that you couldn't bolt one of our shocks up to a stock arm, it's just that there is a better alternative.

The short shock bottoming out is a risk you would take on any any coilover setup installed on a stock arm so tubular control arms are something to think about any way you go. The stock stamped arm is designed to accept a coil spring that spreads the load across the pocket better. With a coilover bolted into that pocket with the t bar style mount, it will either start bending the trunnion or break through the arm.

Let me know if I can help out at all!

marolf101x
01-03-2018, 07:19 AM
There are a few reasons we (Ridetech) require the use of our lower control arms:
1-we drop the lower shock mount compared to the OE shock mount so we can run a longer shock. The monotube shocks we use have a longer body than twin tube shocks, as we need to fit a gas chamber under the oil chamber, so they are subsequently longer. The longer shock body requires mounts that are farther apart than the OE mounts, so you either have to cut off the upper and weld on a new mount, or drop the lower. Since we gain other things with the control arms we prefer to drop the lower mount.
2-Increased caster. The OE control arms will only net around 2 caster (depending on application). By moving the lower ball joint forward, and the upper ball joint backward, we increase caster while keeping the wheel in the center of the wheel well. Ideally you want about as much caster as you can get. . .which in a typical Muscle Car is around 6.
3-Corrected ball joint angles. When you lower a vehicle with OE control arms your ball joints are roughly half way to binding. Binding ball joints result in a broken ball joint, which means the wheel/tire tries to come off the car. So our control arms place the ball joints back in the center of their pivots for full articulation and no binding at the desired lowered ride height.
4-Increased strength. You are correct when you say the OE lower control arm is not strong enough when using a coil over with a trunnion. So we place the lower shock mount in double shear.
5-Better bushings. We use Delrin AF (anti-friction. . .they have Teflon impregnated in the plastic). This provides a solid suspension pivot tha doesn't wear out, does not need to be greased, and doesn't impart the NVH a solid end would (like a heim joint or bearing).

One thing on coil overs. We use a "true" coil over, meaning the spring is supported on both ends by the shock. There are kits available that mount the lower part of the spring to the shock body and the upper part of the spring rests in the OE coil pocket. When the suspension is stroked the spring is pushed on one side more by the frame which side loads the shock body. This can result in wear and premature failure of the body and/or seals. In a true coil over the spring is always being compressed equally as it's "in line" with the shock and secured to the shock on the top and bottom.

Just some general information I thought I'd share as Yanchik and I were discussing this in another thread.

SSLOW6.0
01-03-2018, 07:56 AM
As someone who spent a lot of money on the QA1 Coilover kit only to find it A: doesn't have the ride height adjustability I was looking for (with 550# springs its sits stock adjusted to the lowest position) B: limits your spring choice (Max of 650# in my application) and C: is a pain and half to adjust the ride height or shock settings on the car.

Get a ridetech kit, or another kit which does NOT use the factory spring pocket. There are some out there that use the upper bayonet style mount, but that seems like a lot of load for a single bushing, and shock rod. Cut the coil pocket out, get a sheer mount and get the arms that go with the system.

I didn't want to cut my car up to install coilovers, but it's practically a necessity to get them to function right, with an aggressive stance, without drop spindles.

BMR Sales
01-03-2018, 10:15 AM
Im installing coilovers on my 71 camaro. It will be driven and I'm looking for handling over comfort. Want to keep it single adjustable for price since I'm on a budget. All input will be helpful. thanks

You can get a Viking Double Adjustable (that's all they make) for about the price of a QA1 Single Adjustable. Better Shock at a Better Price!

https://static1.pt-content.com/images/noimg.gif (https://postimages.org/)

project87ss
01-09-2018, 06:40 PM
still undecided, any you guys have pros or cons to Aldan shocks?

1976CamaroGuy
02-14-2019, 07:09 AM
still undecided, any you guys have pros or cons to Aldan shocks?

I was looking at Aldan coilover shocks myself and was skeptical, But they are an american made company from what I can tell....I kept going back and forth.

In the end I got a set-up made by CPP that ended up coming with Viking Shocks and a 2 year warranty. Aside from the springs you are essentially getting Viking products at a good discount.

The kits are $449 shipped on eBay and the best price I have found so far. Even cheaper than Alden.

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67King
02-18-2019, 04:56 AM
Of those, I'd go with Ridetech all the way. Biggest reason is that the others are twin tube. I've rebuilt several sets of Leda's, which are twin tube. And I've run both the Leda's and MCS/Moton, which are single, on my race cars. The MCS are much better made aside of just the twin vs single tube difference, but based on all I've seen, I definitely prefer the single tube. They are also gas charged I believe, whereas the others are not, at least to my knowledge (I don't think you can have a gas charged twin tube without a remote reservoir, anyway).

Just 1 More
02-18-2019, 07:32 AM
I'm probably going to get flamed for this, and that's ok, i'm a big boy,... I have the Chinese copycat lower control arms, replaced the bj's with pro-forged and went with Viking coil overs & 550lb springs. Since I can't just leave anything alone, and since I have more time than money, I reinforced my lower pocket by cutting off the shock mount nuts, used a 3.125" round, 3/16" thick washer from an industrial supply house, put a nice back bevel on the washer so it would fit down in the taper on the back side of the spring pocket and sit down flush on the back side of the bolt holes and welded it in place. Pic's are PRE-WELD, might get some post weld pics if/when I dress my welds since I know i'd definitely get flamed for the way the welds look.. they don't call me "BLOB the welder" for nothin..:lmao:

https://static1.pt-content.com/images/pt/2019/02/47135670311_93e51192c3_c-1.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/2ePdCAT)20190126_104503 (https://flic.kr/p/2ePdCAT) by F G (https://www.flickr.com/photos/153250783@N04/), on Flickr
https://static1.pt-content.com/images/pt/2019/02/40170684883_d8ef4a1371_c-1.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24cKg6e)20190126_123327 (https://flic.kr/p/24cKg6e) by F G (https://www.flickr.com/photos/153250783@N04/), on Flickr
https://static1.pt-content.com/images/pt/2019/02/32193727457_c5eed45e24_c-1.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/R3Rgyv)20190126_123025 (https://flic.kr/p/R3Rgyv) by F G (https://www.flickr.com/photos/153250783@N04/), on Flickr

WallaceMFG
02-18-2019, 07:40 AM
Ridetech mkes a very good product, I would strongly advise you to go with their components, including new arms. You won't be sorry.