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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Two Rivers, Wi.
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rubadub View Post
    Heres one that dissasembles, probably not what your really thinking about, but it might give you an idea, anyway it works good.

    http://www.1969supersport.com/jig01.html

    Rob
    If you have a complete car or can find one, this will assure you have the right measurements, and after you weld up the jig you can double check your measurements.

    http://www.1969supersport.com/buildingbodyjig.html

    Rob

    "There are questions to be answered, and answers to be questioned"


    Jigs, sandblasting, shop, paintroom, rotisserie, pictures, little bit of everything.
    http://www.1969supersport.com


  2. #82
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southeastern MA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Here's mine-I've been dying to post these pictures,I just finished the jig today!
    I got the main I-beams from a neighbor.He knocked down a building on his property and these were left in the rubble.
    I waited until the ground was frozen and dragged them through the yards with a truck.
    One was significantly longer than the other,I cut off half the difference and welded it to the shorter one.They were in crappy shape,they'd been exposed to the weather forever.I ground and flap-wheeled the crud off them and painted them.
    I bought the rest of the steel for the jig and have been working on it for a few months now.
    I got it leveled to within .3 degrees in both axes using leveling bolts in the base of each "foot".
    Obviously the lumber is not part of the jig,it's just something to rest the car on for now.
    Now I need the wheels and tires so I can set ride height,secure the car to the table and start the chassis.
    I just need a massive money injection!


  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Nice job,Dad.Don't get discouraged it doesn't happen overnight and not everyone has an endless wallet.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Idaho Falls, Id
    Posts
    1,190

    Default

    ^^I like that one, I want to build something like that. Wyotech has big twin I beam frame benches. They are even machined totally flat.
    Traven
    auto technician

    67 Firebird http://www.pro-touring.com/showthrea...My-67-Firebird
    89 GTA LS1 swap http://www.pro-touring.com/showthrea...swap&highlight=
    68,69,72 FBs, 2x79 TAs, 01 TA, 68 Mustang, 67 GMC

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    232

    Default




    jason
    Bringing innovation into the industry one build at a time!

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Central CA USA
    Posts
    5,568
    Country Flag: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WS6 View Post
    so after welding the jig together, how do you determine if it's warped, where it's warped, and by how much? You have to measure from somewhere that's known to be true, correct? Thanks guys
    Trey,
    The easiest way would be to get a laser and set it up in the middle of the jig table then stand a ruler up at various points along the table to verify them. If the laser won't shoot 360 degrees around, then put it to one side of the table. The idea is to place the level off to the side of the center of the table, not on one end. It is slightly less accurate if placed on one end but not by much. Of course the laser has to be carefully leveled. I have a survey transit I can use.

    I think if I had a welded-up jig table, I'd bolt on a top rail to it to be the level surface. That way the table supplies the rigidity, but the top rail can be bolted on level and won't be warped from welding heat.
    67 Camaro RS that will be faster than anything Mary owns.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Idaho Falls, Id
    Posts
    1,190

    Default

    ^^ I was just looking at 360* laser levels today lol.


    I've been wanting to make a bench out of I beam and I just told my dad the other day to keep an eye out for about 30' of 12". He said......"you know, I think I saw some in the paper recently and wondered......who the heck would want some I beam"

    shoulda told him sooner
    Traven
    auto technician

    67 Firebird http://www.pro-touring.com/showthrea...My-67-Firebird
    89 GTA LS1 swap http://www.pro-touring.com/showthrea...swap&highlight=
    68,69,72 FBs, 2x79 TAs, 01 TA, 68 Mustang, 67 GMC

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southeastern MA
    Posts
    94

    Default

    The bolt-together table like mine pictured above eliminates the weld-warp problem. However the main reason I built a bolt together table is because I didn't want this airport-sized bohemoth taking up floor space when it wasn't in use.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    584

    Default

    If you are looking for a chassis/frame jig we have one FOR SALE ...

    We are retooling the shop right now and we just built 2 new big chassis jig and we are out of room !!!

    This chassis jig is made of 8" I-Beam with 4" I-Beam cross plates. Built-in leveling screws .

    Jig size is 12' x 5' x 32"

    For more info or photos email us at mikeriggs@mikescustomcars.com


    Mike's Custom Cars
    1-803-329-2835
    www.mikescustomcars.com
    Last edited by MCC; 02-15-2009 at 08:17 AM.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Liberal, KS
    Posts
    5,307
    Country Flag: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by David Pozzi View Post
    Trey,
    The easiest way would be to get a laser and set it up in the middle of the jig table then stand a ruler up at various points along the table to verify them. If the laser won't shoot 360 degrees around, then put it to one side of the table. The idea is to place the level off to the side of the center of the table, not on one end. It is slightly less accurate if placed on one end but not by much. Of course the laser has to be carefully leveled. I have a survey transit I can use.

    I think if I had a welded-up jig table, I'd bolt on a top rail to it to be the level surface. That way the table supplies the rigidity, but the top rail can be bolted on level and won't be warped from welding heat.
    Thanks for answering this David. I hadn't thought of a laser level. Everything I did thing of required knowing the accuracy of it's surface, ie measuring from the floor up or some how running a dial indicator over the top. This makes perfect sense though
    Trey

    "The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese."
    ~ Jon Hammond

    1979 WS6 Trans Am stock LT1/T56 drive train out of my Formula. BMW M-parallel rims. C5/C6 brakes

    build thread http://www.pro-touring.com/showthrea...ghlight=begins

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    63
    Country Flag: Costa Rica

    Default

    Subscribing!

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Motorcity, Canada
    Posts
    290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by David Pozzi View Post
    Trey,
    The easiest way would be to get a laser and set it up in the middle of the jig table then stand a ruler up at various points along the table to verify them. If the laser won't shoot 360 degrees around, then put it to one side of the table. The idea is to place the level off to the side of the center of the table, not on one end. It is slightly less accurate if placed on one end but not by much. Of course the laser has to be carefully leveled. I have a survey transit I can use.

    I think if I had a welded-up jig table, I'd bolt on a top rail to it to be the level surface. That way the table supplies the rigidity, but the top rail can be bolted on level and won't be warped from welding heat.
    If I had to do this all again.. I would definitely bolt the top rails to the legs rather than welding (since you only put heat into the bottom of the main rails when welding). I should have listened to David in the first place. . Instead I had to use the torch and play the trial and error game until everything was flat. It was a pain!

    In the end, having my own chassis fixture for under $250 was the best thing I could have done for my project. It saved a lot of time and took most of the guess work out of positioning components on the car.

    I ended up using a surface plate to true mine up. Worked like a charm.. but only really useful if you have access to one.
    Craig
    1968 Torino GT 4.6L S/C T56 IRS x2
    www.twintorino.com

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    370

    Default

    we ended up plating our table and I already hate it- Makes it hard to work on and now the table is super heavy- Not to mention the 1200 in plate. THe only positive part about the plate it its split in the middle and its easy to measure from the centerline
    Scotts Speed and Custom

    norcal1320.com

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Herts. England
    Posts
    3
    Country Flag: UK

    Default

    I'm lovin this thread... something about box section, I-beams, tubes and half finished monster machines !!

    ...think I need a cold shower !

  15. #95
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    136
    Country Flag: Canada

    Default

    I know that we are building a massive frame table at our storage shop. Mainly because we have two projects that for sure will end up going onto it already, and my brother is talking about building another trail rig, once we have finished my truck and his blazer. Ill get some pics once its all fabbed up, but its going to be 18 feet long and 7 feet wide. Thankfully once its build its not going anywhere since we own the shop.

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    New Derry, PA
    Posts
    1,270
    Country Flag: United States

    Default

    Just found this thread, so I thought I might weigh in. I've been building street and race car chassis (all prototypes) for almost 25 years. I've been teaching how to do it for 10. I've had everything from tilted concrete to 1 1/2" thick steel plate to work off of... What I've learned is:
    1) The size and complexity of your frame jig should be directly proportional to the number of chassis you plan to build on it.
    2) "Occasional use" frame jigs should be sectional (but dowelled or tabbed), and stackable.
    3) The jig material should be sized according to the most common size tubing used in the chassis (bigger tubing=more heat/warpage=larger jig necessary to keep it straight)
    4) NO jig will correct for improper measurements/fitup/welding procedures...
    5) Buy a lot of different length levels, make sure they are calibrated one to another, and USE them. I've seen more chassis errors from tape measures and Sharpie marks than just about anything...
    6) It may seem counter-intuitive, but having a frame jig that is slightly narrower than the chassis and building everything off accurate cross-members makes working on the chassis MUCH easier.
    7) I don't weld on my frame jig (not just weld to it but ON it). I've seen what happens to fairly heavy tables here at the school after repeated welding. Sure, it takes awhile, but it's just a habit I choose not to get into. I have a removable "floating" welding table that sets across the rails of my jig, but doesn't get the jig itself hot.

    The jig I have in my shop now is a 30" by 14' 2 rail prototype I designed with NO crossbracing at the top. The H-beam is 14" tall by 6" wide by 1/4 thick. When a project goes on it, I re-check width measurements at various points along the length and attach cross-members (with dovetails and toe clamps) as needed. I've found that by doing this I can eliminate the need for a centerline (yes, it works fine) and take all my measurements off the edges. The cross-members are the only bridge between the rails at the top, so access to the bottom of the chassis is excellent.

    I've included a photo of the frame jigs we had at the shop I worked in last. The one my race car is sitting on was built with surplus (new) steel from a local building mfg. company. The plate jig we purchased at an equipment auction for $350. It's 4X10' by 1 1/2" thick, with 1/2" tapped holes every 6". Wonderful to use if you have it, but WAY overkill for most chassis jobs.

    Again, this is all just my opinion from a lot of mistakes along the way. Don't spend your life and savings building the best jig in the world. Build the CAR, and enjoy it!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

    Ray Kaufman - Wyotech Chassis Fab and High Performance Instructor. Words of Wisdom from an old master... at Asylum Custom Interiors website

  17. #97
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Looking to build a jig from some solidworks plans i have drawn to spec. I will be using 1.5/095 chromo on the nicer less common frames and carbon steel on the many others.

    looking for a good jig setup that i can build. also looking for ways to maintain the jig throughout its long life.

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, Virginia
    Posts
    177

    Default A few pics of my table setup!

    Mine is 5' x 15' on 8" 31lb I beams with a 1/2" solid plate!
    Ability is not being able to do something once or twice.Ability is being able to perform upon demand!!

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    New Derry, PA
    Posts
    1,270
    Country Flag: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tig Man View Post
    Mine is 5' x 15' on 8" 31lb I beams with a 1/2" solid plate!
    Cool idea with the hubs! Can you hook a trailer hitch to the other end?

    Ray Kaufman - Wyotech Chassis Fab and High Performance Instructor. Words of Wisdom from an old master... at Asylum Custom Interiors website

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, Virginia
    Posts
    177

    Default Hubs!

    I built the table when I worked at the Cup shop on the surface plate and thought, how am I gonna get this thing in my basement garage at home. I normally have them unbolted and out of the way. I use a jack pole bolted in the center of each end to move the table with a floor jack. Dont have a towbar!!

    Mark
    Ability is not being able to do something once or twice.Ability is being able to perform upon demand!!

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