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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    823

    Default Idea for Hydraulic parking brake

    I just wanted to throw out an idea that is in its infancy stage of contemplation in order to get some of you guys input on a parking brake idea.

    I was recently driving an early 60's International Travel-All and I noticed one interesting component that I had never seen before. On the dashboard was a 3 inch long lever that operated a valve that had been plumbed into the brake line running to the rear brakes. To apply the parking brake you 1) push on the foot brake, 2) engage the parking brake lever, 3) release the foot brake. I assume this valve keeps the pressure that was created by the normal foot brake applied to the rear brakes, thus acting as a parking brake.

    Through some internet browsing I found that many aircraft parking brakes operate using a similar concept. What do you guys think of the idea as it could be applied to our vehicles? Does anyone make a valve for this sort of application? Doesn't it seem like this could be easier than fabricating parking brake cables in some applications?

    Lets hear what you all think!!

    Jeff K.
    69 Camaro SS, 406 SB, AFR, TKO600, 9" w/3.73 tru-trac, SPC UCA, AFX Spindles, Lee 670 Box, Baer GT front, C5Z rear. Hyperco Leafs w/ Fays2 Watts Link + Varishocks.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Marshall , MO
    Posts
    687

    Default

    On a suburban I helped build they used a line lock plumbed into the rear brakes, same idea just modern equipment. Heres a pick of the burb http://www.4wheeloffroad.com/eventco.../photo_05.html
    Brad Shepard
    69 Malibu
    Marshall, MO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Fresno, Ca
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    326

    Default

    It's a nice thought, but let me give ya a fer-instance.
    Let's say your car runs over the edge of (insert bad thing here) and it snags/rips your lowered car's hydraulic brake tube/lines/whatever.
    Well, it's gonna be hard to apply hydraulic pressure w/o a transfer medium.
    That's the whole point behind an "emergency brake." If not, it sure would be a LOT easier to install rear discs off a C5 on our cars.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    OshVegas Baby!!!
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    9,628
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    Default

    What John said! The point is not a "parking" brake, but an "emergency" brake in case the hydraulics fail for some reason.

    Andrew
    1970 GTO Version 2.0
    V8TV feature vide0
    Popular Hotrodding feature
    Car Craft feature
    GM High-Tech Performance feature

    "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Here's a good thread on e-brakes which gets into
    the topic of fluid-locks (line-locks)...

    I think as a backup e-brake, line-locks are inexpensive
    and effective. But in an emergency, I want a
    mechanical clamp.

    There's a link in the above thread to a $30 gadget
    from Jamar that does the job and appears to have
    an auto-release to protect against driving with the
    brakes locked.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
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    823

    Default

    Ok, I see what you guys mean about the "emergency" aspect of the idea. I suppose I hadn't thought of using a line-lock as something that does the same thing, but it does make sense.

    I kinda like the product that HSV provided the link for. I mean, for someone with an automatic that is looking for an easy (albeit less effective in emergency situations) solution, that kind of thing would work well.

    Either way, thanks for your input guys!!
    Jeff K.
    69 Camaro SS, 406 SB, AFR, TKO600, 9" w/3.73 tru-trac, SPC UCA, AFX Spindles, Lee 670 Box, Baer GT front, C5Z rear. Hyperco Leafs w/ Fays2 Watts Link + Varishocks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    California
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    If you ran over the edge of something bad and cut your rear brake line(s), I think you'd notice before you even got a chance to park the car.

    Matt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lenoir City, Tennessee
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    Default

    Random thoughts;

    Anyone ever try to stop a car with that "emergency" brake?

    In any case, a lot of large trucks, motor homes, tow trucks, etc. use the line lock style of parking brake.

    On the other hand, I believe our Maryland State Inspection requires a mechanical parking brake.

    Shiny Side Up!
    Bill
    Bill Kistner
    Check out my blog and the latest installment of my current project "In the Company of Devils" at: www.WilliamKElliott.com.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ProTouring442
    Anyone ever try to stop a car with that "emergency" brake?
    Twice.

    My first car was a 66 Mustang coupe which still had
    the original single-reservoir master. It failed before
    I had gotten around to swapping it out. That e-brake
    was scary slow, but it eventually did the job.

    The other time I was the front seat passenger in
    an awful wreck. A kid ran a stop light going over
    60 mph and t-boned our driver's side door and front
    fender. The driver was knocked unconcious by the
    impact. I was out for a half-second. When I got my
    bearings, I saw that our car was rolling towards a
    ditch which had a steep 10-foot drop. When the driver
    didn't respond to my yelling, I reached over and
    yanked the console e-brake. It stopped us instantly
    and prevented a nasty tumble into that ditch. We
    all walked away from that accident with relatively
    minor injuries.

    I always preferred under-dash pedal e-brakes to
    the console handles found in most Dern Furin' cars.
    But ever since that accident, I've been a big fan of
    them. When I rod my 66 Mustang vert, it will get
    one too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
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    3,818
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    Default

    Well as for using it as a parking brake which they were designed for, to lock a car after parking because old trannys didnt have park and older low compression engines were never ment to hold a car.
    Now can we use parking brakes for an emergency brake in the event of a hydralic failure,,,yes doe we ever do it not mostly.
    But NAPA has sold mechanical /hydralic brake locks for years. I have even seen a fella use one and a spring/bungie strap to launch a drag car. He only had one arm.
    Nothing wrong with incorporating one into your car, might even prove usefull for antitheft too.
    Lee

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Hi guys,

    Going back to this old thread for a second...if a linelock were to be used and say the battery quit after being parked for a long time, would the linelock disengage?? Or is it a device that needs current just when its first applied?

    Thanks!
    Manuel Scettri
    ------------------------------------------------
    1973 Firebird - Pontiac 455, coilovers, Baer brakes, etc
    1990 2 Door 4Runner - Ford 302, 4 in lift, 33s
    1990 2 Door 4Runner - Yes, another one. Stock for now...
    1990 Nissan Patrol 2 Door - Stock
    2010 Infiniti G37 - The Daily Driver

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    OshVegas Baby!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp455
    Hi guys,

    Going back to this old thread for a second...if a linelock were to be used and say the battery quit after being parked for a long time, would the linelock disengage?? Or is it a device that needs current just when its first applied?

    Thanks!
    Needs current to be active and hold pressure. It is just a spring loaded solinoid. Press the brakes. Activate solinoid. That hold the pressure on the front brakes. Once the button is release (or the battery dies) the solinoid will open and pressure is released.

    Andrew
    1970 GTO Version 2.0
    V8TV feature vide0
    Popular Hotrodding feature
    Car Craft feature
    GM High-Tech Performance feature

    "You were the gun, your voice was the trigger, your bravery was the barrel, your eyes were the bullets." ~ Her


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
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    233
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    Default

    Anyone know how long a line-lock can be applied before it kills the battery? Or how much juice a solenoid draws? It'd be curious and informative to know. I have a line-lock on my car, which was a street/strip car...now it is all apart. But I'm keeping the line-lock installed, and it'd make a good parking brake with the 5-speed that's going in. Just curious as to how long it should/could be applied.
    Wayne Smith
    '70 Camaro - 406 - Street/Strip being converted to Pro-Touring (best 1/4 run - 11.05 @ 121, 1.50 60' - All Motor)
    '47 Chevy truck - 250 L6 / 4 spd - Resto/Rat Rod/Work Truck in the works
    '04 Suburban 2500 4x4 - 8100 BBC, DD and tow vehicle

    View pics at:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/83785049@N00/
    A couple vids of it revving:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuyIgo06Liw
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ilcp3a9fik&feature=user
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K95WCTdsbpY&feature=user

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Patterson, NY
    Posts
    791

    Default

    I know we have a valve like that on one of our wreckers, and the boss says not to park it overnight with the hydraulic brakes active, because it'll push past the seals in the caliper.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Chico, California Nor-Cal
    Posts
    359

    Default

    don't use a line lock, i bought one off Ebay for $30. Apply brakes, push knob down... you are locked!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rustburg, Virginia
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    3,731
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    Default

    I don't think you can pass annual inspection in Va with anything other than a mechanical ebrake.
    1970 RS/SS350 139K on the clock:
    89 TPI motor w/ 1pc rear seal coupled to a Viper T56 via Mcleod's modular bellhousing w/ hydraulic T/O bearing from the Viper, 12 bolt rear w/ 3.73 gearing, SC&C upper control arms, factory lowers with Delalums, C5 brakes at all four corners, Front Wheels 17x8's with Sumi 255/40/17 and Rear Wheels 17x9's with Sumi 275/40/17.
    Brief description of the work done so far can be found here: http://www.nastyz28.com/forum/showthread.php?t=112454


  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    4,165
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks71z28
    don't use a line lock, i bought one off Ebay for $30. Apply brakes, push knob down... you are locked!
    Then it would work fine as a "parking brake."

    Would work if you needed the car stopped while running, any other time just leave it in gear.

    Yeah, probably not the safest way to go. But niether is driving a 40 year old car, :-) .

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
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    There are a lot of parking brakes on newer cars that would never work as an "emergency brake." I agree that a mechanical system is nice as a backup to hydrollc in the case of emergency. That said a lot of mechanical systems are not capable of locking the tires or stopping a car at speed.
    Lots of autocross & track day videos of my car: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheDude023

    68 Camaro http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2334689/1

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    823

    Default

    Is there any risk of damaging piston seals or anything like that in the calipers from sustained clamping (say overnight) if you were to use a hydraulic-style parking brake?
    Jeff K.
    69 Camaro SS, 406 SB, AFR, TKO600, 9" w/3.73 tru-trac, SPC UCA, AFX Spindles, Lee 670 Box, Baer GT front, C5Z rear. Hyperco Leafs w/ Fays2 Watts Link + Varishocks.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
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    211
    Country Flag: Sweden

    Default

    Here is My version of a parking/emergency brake.
    (Not finished on pics."Under construction")

    I used an old Toyota Clutch Slave Cylinder , connected to the original parkingbrake pedal/wire. Correction :"MASTER cylinder"
    It´s not very "High Tech" looking , but You get the idea.

    Rear calipers are Wilwood Dynalites .
    So as a parkingbrake ,it works really good.
    When pushing the P-brake pedal while driving,there is no problem to stop the car. (even locks the tires)

    I know that it could be a problem if the piston seals are leaking, when parked.
    So i allways leave it in gear.

    Before , I had Wilwoods single piston floating Mechanical Spot Calipers in the rear for P-brake. Didn´t work at all.

    I talked to a guy at The Swedish Motor Vehicle Inspection Co.
    He said that even some newer Mercedes´ and BMW´s barely passes the tests. Parking/Emerg.- brakes are to weak.


    Anyone have experience with these new Wilwoods?
    http://www.wilwood.com/Products/001-...-cpb/index.asp

    So,...continue post ideas about P-brake solutions.


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