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  1. #1
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    Default Flush mount glass in 67 Camaro

    I am sure front and rear glass has been flush mounted by someone out there.



    I wanted to know if the original replacement glass is used or is custom glass required? Any one have any pictures and a little history about doing it or having someone do it?

    Thanks
    Joe


  2. #2
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    Don't have any answers for you, but maybe, just maybe, if you e-mail Chip Foose he'll respond. Way back in the late 80's or early 90's he flush mounted the windshield and back glass on his '69 Firebird. I saw it in Hot Rod magazine. Unfortunately I can't remember the month or year of the mag. But I think I remember reading that they used the factory glass, they just removed the windshield and trim and worked the metal to get a closer gap between the pillars ,roof and glass. Ain't it funny how my wife gets on to me all the time about forgetting stuff, but I can remember a magazine article about a car 10-15 years ago!!
    undefinedmy lugnuts require more torque than your import makes........

  3. #3
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    Most people use there stock windows and just raise them. You can do that by making the lip higher or using thicker gasket. Then after that you can do the bodywork and make it the way you want. Good luck


    -David

  4. #4
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    Joe,
    I'm flush-mounting my front and back windows. Check out what Dennis Linson and Brian Schein have posted in the past on this.

    There is nothing other than the original sized glass. I just researched this exact thing last month. In the end I ordered a windshield and back window from Vintage Glass. (http://www.vintageglass.com). They prep the glass so that a modern urethane glue will hold the glass in place. You will need make the window frames a little smaller to account for the lack of old-style gasket. I'll post up some pics when I do mine ... I'm just waiting on the glass to show up to get going.

    jp
    John Parsons



    II Much Fabrication's Blog -- New products, Fabrication sequences, etc.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by F70t/a
    that is the car that made me get into this mess in the first place. i've always wanted to flush mount the windows but i was told that it is a bit pricy.
    It's shake and bake!!! and i helped!
    Drewco Homes

  6. #6
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    Ya same here. Oneday I was looking online and seeing what else I wanted to do to my bird. then i seen that and knew that I wanted flush mounted widnows. it looks better i think
    -David

  7. #7
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    John - I thought you had some pics on your Nova in the past. I was going to reply earlier to check with you, but you beat me to the punch.

    The first car I saw up close with the flush mount glass was Trepanier's Sniper, I fell in love. Gives the car that late model, finished look I think.
    Later - Craig

    finleybrosmotorsports@gmail.com

    '70 Chevelle (in storage now, probably will never be back on its wheels again!)

  8. #8
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    No flush mount pics ... yet. I'm expecting my glass from Vintage any day now.

    Ryan (ryans67deuce) has posted some good pics of shaved drip rails too.

    jp
    John Parsons



    II Much Fabrication's Blog -- New products, Fabrication sequences, etc.

  9. #9
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    I did my back window and it was a little trickery than I thought the glass needs to be raised to the surface of the body. But when you do that it is not the same curvature as the body. The glass stuck up 3/16 higher than the roof in the center of the car. I donít have any pictures right now I am not at home.

    So this is how I did it I spent a lot of time look at all the new production cars and how their glass is put in. The rear window in a newer Pontiac Grand Am is a grate example of flush mount glass and that is what I emulated my design after. It uses a piece of rubber trim that goes all the way around the glass. So I went to my local glass shop and asked to look at their moldings once I found a molding that was similar I had to by a 100 foot roll of it that is the only way he would sell it me. Not bad is around $80. Next thing I did was to put this molding on my original glass and set the window in the frame and see what need to be done. After a careful inspection I found that I need top make the top of the opening a 1/4 inch smaller and the sides 3/16 smaller and let the glass sit flush with the bottom of the window frame. At this time it became apparent the difference in the curvature of the body and the glass. Here is the thing I am not sure of my car was badly rusted and has new quarters and the enter roof edge was repaired so the problems I had may not exist on a car that hasnít had the type of rust problems that I had to content with. At this Point I weld a strip o 3/16 steel that was around 3 foot long to the roof centered up and even to the roof edge ( I have pictures I will post later on). This job is not for those who are still fell the use of body fillers it Taboo. Polyester and fiberglass filler have come a long way since the 60s and 70s and when used properly work just fine. At this point there was a large transition that needed to be blended with use of short strand fiber glass after which I topcoated the entire roof (roof was in very bad shape a lot of dings one large crown where some one bet out a dent a stretched the roof more that I could shrink it and thirty years of abuse) then sand sand sand.

    The front window was done in a similar manner but I am not finished with it all I did with the front was to use the same molding as the rear. I welded to 1/4 strips to both of the pillars and raised the window until if was flush at the top. The thing that still needs to be worked out is the bottom of the windshield molding. This is used to hold the cowl down in it original design and buy not using it there is a large gap between the glass and the cowl. I am undecided what to do at this point just use the trim and paint it or mold it into the cowl and figure another way to hold the rear of the cowl down.

    I will post some pictures tomorrow and hopefully it will all make senses.

    Brian

  10. #10
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    May 2003
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    Default Flush mount windows

    I just wrote a reply to this and tried to post it and it wouldn't post. Now I'll have to write it again.

    John, I believe I may have your rear glass. I received all of my glass and the rear window has the wrong curvature and is also taller. It sure doesn't fit my Nova. They also got my name wrong on the mailing address.

    Here is a link to the body work page on my web site. my Nova's bodywork

    I created a new ledge for the glass to sit on. I raise the glass about 3/8 inch and also closed up the opening about 1/2 inch per side. I then added a filler piece between the glass and the body. I tried to keep about a 1/4 inch gap all the way around.

    I found a similar problem as Brian in that the body at the A and C pillars stuck out farther and in order to make it flush with the window, I moved the pillars in. I put the new ledge at the same height as the orignial and then cut a section out the length of the side of the window in the return area between the glass and the body. I then pushed the pilars in flush with the window and welded together. The glass on my 62 Nova wraps around to the sides of the car. I don't know if the Camaro will have the same problems. I wish I would have had taken more pictures when doing it, I just never thought anyone would be asking me how I did it.

    If you have any more questions I'd be glad to answer. Good luck.

    Dennis Linson

  11. #11
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    They also got my name wrong on the mailing address
    Did they call you John Parsons? I know when I called a couple of times, they wanted to tell me about your stuff:

    VAG: "Are you Dennis?"

    JP: "No, my name is John. John Parsons."

    VAG: "Uh, OK, you've got the 64, right?"

    JP: "No, I've got the 67."

    VAG: "Well, I have stuff here for Dennis Linson's 64."

    JP: "Dennis has a 62. What about my 67 windows?"

    VAG: "What was your name again?"


    jp
    Last edited by parsonsj; 11-20-2004 at 07:49 AM.
    John Parsons



    II Much Fabrication's Blog -- New products, Fabrication sequences, etc.

  12. #12
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    Here are some pictures of the rear window I donít have any of the front glass in the car yet.

    Brian
    Attached Images Attached Images        

  13. #13
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    Brian nice job
    -David

  14. #14
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    For the front windshield could you cut the cowl along the top edge and mold it into the windshield? The bottom of the cowl where the cut was made to have a stepped seem that comes together. The bottom the orig cowl would slip up under the mounted cowl area. It would have a body line but you might be able to do it where the vents are cut? WOuld take mjor work I think to make it look right though.

    Then again why could you not just mount the cowl. Fit to the wind shield like you did the rest of the body by adding material and leave as is. If you ever need to you can remove the cowl just as you would a stock/original cowl. Does it have to secure the windshield in the bottom area? Maybe the cowl can fit tightly over an area that fit against the bottom of the windshield if this is the case?

    Joe
    "If you can leave black marks on a straight from the time you exit a corner till the time you brake for the next turn.......
    Then, you have enough horsepower."
    -Mark Donahue



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