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  1. #641
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    Nov 2012
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    Looking hardcore there John !

    Feel free to chime in or ask technical questions. I am here to help where I can.

    Ron Sutton

    Ron Sutton Race Technology
    Your One Stop, Turn & Go Fast, Car Building Resource Center for Autocross, Track, Road Racing & Triple Duty Pro-Touring Cars

    Check out our 400 Page Car Building Catalog HERE

    Features: Suspension, Chassis, Cages, Brakes, Rear Ends, Engines, Transmisssions, Aero & Much, Much More!


  2. #642
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    This may be helpful


  3. #643
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    May 2012
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    Hungary
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Sutton View Post
    The airflow into the grill is always a challenging area. Getting airflow in is easy. Blocking airflow out is easy. The tough part is deciding how much to let in & block off.

    The more airflow you can make go over or around the front end (not in the grill) the more front downforce the car will have. But obviously if we block off too much, the engine overheats.

    For Pro-Touring Cars I am a fan of blocking off any airflow that is not specifically for the radiator & brake ducts. Some bumpers & Lower valances have slots. If they're not needed, block them off in a smooth way.

    As far as the grille goes, I like to make black aluminum sheets (cut to fit) in multiple sizes (or restriction amounts) that go behind the grille to partially close off airflow. Then you can play around with how much to close off without permanently affecting the car's appearance.


    Thanks for the advices.
    We are not racers not even close to that business. We are only average guys with lots of love to the ProTouring cars here in Europe.
    Trying to get as much info as much we can get to build my Nova.
    Actually this is the stage we are now with my front end. Bumper mods almost finish.
    I don't know if this is any good or creating more trouble ))
    The plan is to get more air from here because we will close the grille assy somehow )
    Hopefully that air we get there will be enough for keeping cool the engine.
    I will have vents on the hood behind the radiator so hopefully the air will move through it.
    The air will not be directed by any means. It should go through the bumper into the engine compartment and hopefully leaves through the vents. That is the plan
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  4. #644
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by medbali76 View Post
    Thanks for the advices.
    We are not racers not even close to that business. We are only average guys with lots of love to the ProTouring cars here in Europe.
    Trying to get as much info as much we can get to build my Nova.
    Actually this is the stage we are now with my front end. Bumper mods almost finish.
    I don't know if this is any good or creating more trouble ))
    The plan is to get more air from here because we will close the grille assy somehow )
    Hopefully that air we get there will be enough for keeping cool the engine.
    I will have vents on the hood behind the radiator so hopefully the air will move through it.
    The air will not be directed by any means. It should go through the bumper into the engine compartment and hopefully leaves through the vents. That is the plan

    Looks correct. But you'll still need to figure out how much airflow you need to keep the engine cool. I suggest you work up to in steps.
    Feel free to chime in or ask technical questions. I am here to help where I can.

    Ron Sutton

    Ron Sutton Race Technology
    Your One Stop, Turn & Go Fast, Car Building Resource Center for Autocross, Track, Road Racing & Triple Duty Pro-Touring Cars

    Check out our 400 Page Car Building Catalog HERE

    Features: Suspension, Chassis, Cages, Brakes, Rear Ends, Engines, Transmisssions, Aero & Much, Much More!

  5. #645
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Hungary
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Sutton View Post
    Looks correct. But you'll still need to figure out how much airflow you need to keep the engine cool. I suggest you work up to in steps.
    I have a very big radiator that should help also. Probably we will leave a few open areas on the grille assy and the air will be ducted from there.

  6. #646
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    san diego
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    113
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    What are your thoughts on ducting the radiator this way. I plan to make an air dam to seal the front end off in the corners also. I am also ducting air out of the fenders and plan to build a belly pan soon. Thoughts?
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  7. #647
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtrhd329 View Post
    What are your thoughts on ducting the radiator this way. I plan to make an air dam to seal the front end off in the corners also. I am also ducting air out of the fenders and plan to build a belly pan soon. Thoughts?
    It's hard for me to give you any "absolute" advice on air extraction through the hood, because I don't have any experience in it. All of my aero development experience involved us utilizing the hood as an area to create downforce. I have racing friends who have been involved in race car development with air extraction through the hood and they shared 3 key things with me.

    1. If it's done wrong ... the airflow trying to escape the hood doesn't blend well with the air flow going over the hood ... these two airflow streams will simply collide & create turbulence ... creating little to no downforce. So the goal needs to be to get the airflow coming out of hood to blend well with the air flow going over the hood.

    2. Where the two air streams need to merge is just before the base of the windshield. See photo. If they merge earlier than that, they found no way to avoid turbulence & the loss of downforce. You'll also notice they put a small fin (fiberglass wicker) on the leading edge of the main (center) hood extraction duct. This helps the airflow over the hood separate from the hood & blend into the airflow coming out the extractors cleaner, with reduced turbulence.

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    3. While the smart move is to make the nose of the car ... and the leading portion of the hood ... as airflow friendly as possibly ... you're still going to have a lot less downforce on the hood. So you want to make sure your extraction strategy created as much or more downforce to make up for it.

    That's all I got. Without hands on experience with this strategy, I find this difficult to offer any specific advice on shapes & locations, other than what my buddies shared. Best wishes.



    Feel free to chime in or ask technical questions. I am here to help where I can.

    Ron Sutton

    Ron Sutton Race Technology
    Your One Stop, Turn & Go Fast, Car Building Resource Center for Autocross, Track, Road Racing & Triple Duty Pro-Touring Cars

    Check out our 400 Page Car Building Catalog HERE

    Features: Suspension, Chassis, Cages, Brakes, Rear Ends, Engines, Transmisssions, Aero & Much, Much More!

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